Day: March 9, 2019

R Kelly Investigations Interview

R Kelly Investigations Interview

Gayle King was “irritated” by R. Kelly’s loud coughing during an interview with his “girlfriends”.

Earlier this week, the CBS This Morning co-anchor spoke to the embattled singer in relation to numerous allegations of sexual abuse and misconduct against women, which he had denied. King also sat down to chat with Joycelyn Savage and Azriel Clary, the two women whose parents allege they are currently in abusive relationships with Kelly, and during the discussion, she noted that the R&B star often tried to interrupt them.

“I saw Robert (R. Kelly) leave, I did not see him come back in. So, I did not know that he had come back in, neither did (his publicist) Darryll Johnson, who had assured me that he would not be (there),” she recalled during an appearance on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert on Thursday night.

“R. Kelly comes back in and he can hear the conversation, he’s out of my eyesight and he’s out of the girls’ eyesight too, they did not see him. But when there was a question he didn’t like, and I can’t remember what it was, you’d hear this (loud coughing). Now I’m a little irritated because I’m thinking, ‘Who on the crew is coughing like that?’

“Then it becomes clear to me that it is R. Kelly. I’m told that R. Kelly is talking to members of my own team (and saying), ‘They (Savage and Clary) are doing OK, they’re doing OK, should I go in and stop it? Should I go in and stop it?’ He’s having a dialogue with people on my team. And (make-up artist Lazarus Jean-Baptiste) says, ‘No, you should probably just leave it alone.’”

Elsewhere in the interview, host Stephen asked King about the now-viral photo taken by Jean-Baptiste on the set, in which she is seated while an enraged Kelly towers over her. And the 64-year-old explained that she was simply focused on staying calm at that moment, as she didn’t want to anger him any further.

“I could see him getting more heated, he was upset with me about some of the questions. So, when I see Robert getting really upset, and he stands out of his seat, my initial reaction was: ‘Oh God, please don’t leave, please don’t leave,’” reflected King, adding that she was determined to make eye contact with the 52-year-old. “I thought if we had both gotten emotional and amped up like that, what good would have come of that? So, I thought, ‘Be calm, say his name,’ because you know when someone does say your name, it is soothing.”

Kelly has been charged with 10 counts of aggravated sexual abuse against four alleged victims. In addition, he was locked up on Wednesday after failing to make child support payments and is also facing a new police investigation over claims he sexually assaulted a 13-year-old girl, allegations he has rejected. He is due to make two court appearances later in the month.

@repost How Can a Father Get Full Custody

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source https://canoe.com/entertainment/television/gayle-king-irritated-by-r-kellys-coughing-during-chat-with-his-girlfriends

By The Wall of Law March 9, 2019 Off

R Kelly Investigations Interview

R Kelly Investigations Interview

Gayle King was “irritated” by R. Kelly’s loud coughing during an interview with his “girlfriends”.

Earlier this week, the CBS This Morning co-anchor spoke to the embattled singer in relation to numerous allegations of sexual abuse and misconduct against women, which he had denied. King also sat down to chat with Joycelyn Savage and Azriel Clary, the two women whose parents allege they are currently in abusive relationships with Kelly, and during the discussion, she noted that the R&B star often tried to interrupt them.

“I saw Robert (R. Kelly) leave, I did not see him come back in. So, I did not know that he had come back in, neither did (his publicist) Darryll Johnson, who had assured me that he would not be (there),” she recalled during an appearance on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert on Thursday night.

“R. Kelly comes back in and he can hear the conversation, he’s out of my eyesight and he’s out of the girls’ eyesight too, they did not see him. But when there was a question he didn’t like, and I can’t remember what it was, you’d hear this (loud coughing). Now I’m a little irritated because I’m thinking, ‘Who on the crew is coughing like that?’

“Then it becomes clear to me that it is R. Kelly. I’m told that R. Kelly is talking to members of my own team (and saying), ‘They (Savage and Clary) are doing OK, they’re doing OK, should I go in and stop it? Should I go in and stop it?’ He’s having a dialogue with people on my team. And (make-up artist Lazarus Jean-Baptiste) says, ‘No, you should probably just leave it alone.’”

Elsewhere in the interview, host Stephen asked King about the now-viral photo taken by Jean-Baptiste on the set, in which she is seated while an enraged Kelly towers over her. And the 64-year-old explained that she was simply focused on staying calm at that moment, as she didn’t want to anger him any further.

“I could see him getting more heated, he was upset with me about some of the questions. So, when I see Robert getting really upset, and he stands out of his seat, my initial reaction was: ‘Oh God, please don’t leave, please don’t leave,’” reflected King, adding that she was determined to make eye contact with the 52-year-old. “I thought if we had both gotten emotional and amped up like that, what good would have come of that? So, I thought, ‘Be calm, say his name,’ because you know when someone does say your name, it is soothing.”

Kelly has been charged with 10 counts of aggravated sexual abuse against four alleged victims. In addition, he was locked up on Wednesday after failing to make child support payments and is also facing a new police investigation over claims he sexually assaulted a 13-year-old girl, allegations he has rejected. He is due to make two court appearances later in the month.

@repost Matrimonial Solicitors

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source https://canoe.com/entertainment/television/gayle-king-irritated-by-r-kellys-coughing-during-chat-with-his-girlfriends

By The Wall of Law March 9, 2019 Off

030819-Saudi_App_Female_Travel_Restrictions

030819-Saudi_App_Female_Travel_Restrictions

The Saudi government app Absher is mostly a way for people to pay traffic fines and complete other administrative tasks electronically. But one feature isn’t sitting well with civil-rights advocates: the ability for men to grant or deny a woman permission to travel.

Regardless of their age, women in Saudi Arabia must have the consent of a male relative to obtain a passport, travel or marry. In the past, a travel permit was a paper document issued by the Interior Ministry and signed by a male relative. The Absher app replaces the need for a paper document.

The app is merely implementing existing laws, and removing it would not change or remove the guardianship rules in place. Nonetheless, the feature has sparked calls for leading tech companies to block access through their app stores.

“The ingenuity of American technology companies should not be perverted to violate the human rights of Saudi women,” U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, a California Democrat, wrote in a letter to Apple and Google.

According to Speier’s office, Google won’t remove the app because it doesn’t consider it a violation of Google’s terms of service, while Apple is still investigating.

Google and Apple declined to comment. Apple CEO Tim Cook told NPR last month that the company would “take a look” at the app.

The app includes a setting where Saudi men can grant or deny their spouses, daughters and minor sons the ability to travel abroad. Through an integrated system, immigration officials at the airport can see the status of a woman’s travel permit by scanning her passport details. According to published reports, the government’s system can also send text messages when dependants exit and enter the country, though the app itself doesn’t appear to track women using the phone’s location services.

Although the app has been around for years, it has only recently gotten the attention of human-rights and other critics.

Some civil-rights advocates acknowledge that the ability for guardians to control travel permissions exist regardless of the app. But they complain that U.S. companies are enabling that practice by allowing the app.

“These companies don’t have to support this,” said Jillian York, director for international freedom of expression at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. “They’re making the choice.”

Sen. Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat, wrote Apple and Google to criticize that they “are making it easier for Saudi men to control their family members from the convenience of their smartphones and restrict their movement.”

Some Saudi citizens have pushed back against calls for the app’s removal. Khawla Al-Kuraya, a female professor in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, wrote in a Bloomberg opinion piece that the app makes travel easier to enable by cutting out long lines and paperwork.

The Saudi Interior Ministry said the app is “an essential and direct means” for Saudis to access government services anytime, anywhere. The ministry also condemned what is said was a “systematic campaign aimed at questioning the purpose of Absher services.”

Apple’s app guidelines seem to give the company latitude in what apps are considered unacceptable, including those that have “content that is offensive, insensitive, upsetting, intended to disgust or in exceptionally poor taste.” Google also has guidelines to prohibit apps that facilitate harassment and characteristics tied to systemic discrimination.

In recent years, there have been 13 billion visits to the Absher app, 11 million users and more than 110,00 million services done, according to Absher officials quoted in local Saudi media.

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source https://canoe.com/technology/saudi-app-criticized-for-feature-to-control-womens-travel

By The Wall of Law March 9, 2019 Off

Liberals Lack The Political Will To Truly Push A Feminist Foreign Policy

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau attends a news conference on Mar. 7, 2019 in Ottawa.

The Trudeau government’s emphasis on a feminist foreign policy was first articulated in a speech by Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland in June 2016. A year later, the Trudeau government announced its Feminist International Assistance Policy, intended to allocate 15 per cent of Canada’s $2.6 billion development assistance to support gender equality, women and girls by 2022.

As International Women’s Day 2019 rolls around, pundits continue to debate the effectiveness of Trudeau’s vision for international development, whether it has sufficient funding, and whether it is properly conceived. But such considerations may be moot if the government continues a “business as usual” approach in other sectors.

For example, the Trudeau government has been loath to press Canada’s mining industry to higher standards, despite promises to do so prior to the 2015 elections. Yet studies of the oil, gas and mining industries make clear that there is a severe gender bias in the benefits and risks associated with the resource extraction industry around the world.

From Zambia to Peru, to the Dominican Republic, the negative social impacts of Canada’s overseas mining interests disproportionately affect women. So while the jobs and economic benefits of these Canadian operations overseas accrue disproportionately to men, the women in disrupted communities contend with the resulting impact of drug and alcohol abuse, sexual violence and family breakdown.

Workers at a garment factory work at MB Knit garment factory in Narayanganj, near Dhaka, Bangladesh.

A similar trend exists in the international garment industry. The collapse of the Rana Plaza building in Dhaka, Bangladesh in 2013 killed over 1,100 workers, most of them women working in a factory manufacturing clothes for Zara, Walmart and Joe Fresh. While that incident temporarily shined a spotlight on the terrible working conditions for Bangladesh’s garment workers, women in the international garment industry — many working for Canadians companies — continue to disproportionately face challenges including unsafe working conditions, low wages, and sexual abuse.

Over a year ago, the Trudeau government announced plans to create a Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise, which would investigate accusations of wrongdoing by Canadian mining, energy, and textile companies overseas. To date, apparently, no progress has been made in establishing this office. But even if it had been launched, it would hardly compensate for years of lack of government oversight on Canadian businesses operating abroad.

Worse, the Trudeau government has done little to address “business as usual” in the war industry. While the Trudeau government recently budgeted $62 billion in new defence spending for Canada, it failed to add any new funding to its new Feminist International Assistance Policy. Again and again, studies show that women suffer disproportionately from armed conflict, both during and after war. Conflict creates higher levels of violence against women with the breakdown of the rule of law and social structures, the availability of small arms, and the normalization of gender-based violence.

Of course, Trudeau’s failure to cancel its $15 billion arms sale to Saudi Arabia is perhaps the most egregious example of “business as usual.” Saudi Arabia is accused of war crimes in a four-year-old war in Yemen, which it orchestrated and continues to lead. Three million Yemenis have been forced from their homes and 22 million require life-saving humanitarian assistance. Yet the Trudeau government maintains its arms trade with Saudi Arabia even while there is evidence that Canadian arms have been brought into the Yemeni theatre.

Khalida Jarrar (centre) is welcomed by her supporters and relatives after she was released from detention that lasted 20 months, in front of her house in Nablus, West Bank on Feb. 28, 2019.

Canada continues to provide diplomatic cover to Israel too, despite its over 50-year-old military occupation of the Palestinian territories. Beyond the day-to-day burden that all Palestinian women under Israeli occupation must bear, the Trudeau government’s silence in the high-profile cases of two women is particularly unconscionable. Israel has repeatedly jailed Palestinian lawyer, feminist and human rights activist Khalida Jarrar. Jarrar, who spent much of the last year in an Israeli jail, was never charged with a crime but simply held under an “administrative detention” order that was repeatedly renewed. It bears noting that prior to her most recent arrest, Jarrar was leading the Palestinian initiative to take Israel to the International Criminal Court. Canada was also mum in the case of 17-year-old Ahed Tamimi, a Palestinian teen who was sentenced to eight months in jail after she was filmed slapping an Israel soldier.

So it does little for the Trudeau government to tout a foreign policy that purports to promote the rights of women, while protecting industries and countries which oppress women wholesale. The challenge is not the lack of funds to implement a feminist humanitarian aid program, but the lack of political will to manage the mining, garment and war industries in a principled way.

As long as the Trudeau government continues to agree to “business as usual” in these massive industries, the world’s women and their underfunded Canadian aid package hardly stand a chance.

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source https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/thomas-woodley/trudeau-feminist-foreign-policy_a_23686764/

By The Wall of Law March 9, 2019 Off