Day: April 12, 2019

Helping Your Kids To Buy A House? Here’s How To Do The Most Canadian Thing Ever

Parents who want to help their children buy a house should consider their own needs in retirement first, financial advisors say.

OTTAWA — Buying a home is a big step for anyone and experts say that parents looking to help their children need to make sure it is affordable and that their children are ready for the change.

Chris Catliff, president and chief executive of BlueShore Financial, says his bank’s seminars for parents looking to help their kids buy a house are always packed with mums and dads wanting to learn how they can help.

He says parents first need to ask themselves if they can help without compromising their own financial security.

Watch: This office is what passes for a one-bedroom apartment in Toronto. Story continues below.

“When you downsize your home and there is a lot of equity in it, that frees up capital that often is used for funding kids either first-time buy or move-up buy,” he said.

But Catliff says you need to consider your own needs for that money and other savings and that may include long-term care in later years.

Once you figure out what you can afford, parents can help their children buy their first home in a number of different ways.

The most straightforward is to gift the money to your child, although Catliff says there are risks associated with it such as what may happen to the value of your gift if your child separates from their spouse or partner.

Earlier on HuffPost Canada:

Instead of gifting the money, he suggests you could structure it as a loan that you could in the future forgive if you want, perhaps as part of your estate planning.

Parents could also act as a guarantor for a child on the loan, a move that would reduce the risk a lender faces and allow the child to obtain a better rate.

Other options could be to buy a property and rent it to your child as an alternative or co-ownership, where you and your child live together and share ownership.

“You really have to sit down, calculate it and make sure you can afford it.”Nathalie Weiner, TD Bank

Nathalie Weiner, a district vice-president at TD Bank in Ottawa, says a survey done by the bank found that one in four baby boomers are helping their children or grandchildren financially.

“If you’re going to help out your child with a down payment, whether it is by form of a loan or a donation or a co-signer of a mortgage, you have to make sure that actually fits into your financial plan,” she said.

Weiner said the cost of becoming a homeowner isn’t just the price of the home and it is important that your child is ready to deal with those costs too.

“It’s expensive owning a home. It’s not the same as renting,” she said.

“You really have to sit down, calculate it and make sure you can afford it.”

Weiner said picking the right way to help your child buy a house, whether it is a gift, loan or other way, is about striking a balance with your own financial plan.

Where will the money come from?

Catliff says parents looking to lend or give the money also need to plan where they money will come from.

If you’re selling an investment that has risen significantly to make your gift, you may be faced with a large tax bill if you don’t have other losses that you can use to offset the gains come tax time.

Buying a home is a big step and Catliff says parents who want to help their children need to be sure their child is ready to become a homeowner.

He says parents want to give a helping hand, but it can be highly emotional and you can run the risk of hurting your relationship with your children.

“It’s really important to plan it and get good financial advice,” he said.

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source https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2019/04/12/help-children-buy-house_a_23710970/

By The Wall of Law April 12, 2019 Off

033019-Trump_Immigration

033019-Trump_Immigration

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said Friday he is considering sending “Illegal Immigrants” to Democratic strongholds to punish congressional foes for inaction on border security — just hours after White House and Homeland Security officials insisted the idea had been rejected as fast as it had been brought up.

“Due to the fact that Democrats are unwilling to change our very dangerous immigration laws, we are indeed, as reported, giving strong considerations to placing Illegal Immigrants in Sanctuary Cities only,” Trump tweeted. He added that, “The Radical Left always seems to have an Open Borders, Open Arms policy – so this should make them very happy!”

The tweets, which appeared to catch officials at the Department of Homeland Security by surprise, came as critics were blasting news that the White House had at least twice considered a plan to release detained immigrants into so-called sanctuary cities. Critics branded the plan, supposedly rejected, as an effort to use migrants as pawns to go after political opponents.

“Sanctuary cities” are places where local authorities do not co-operate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials, denying information or resources that would help ICE round up for deportation people living in the country illegally.

They include New York City and San Francisco, home city of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who on Friday called the idea “unworthy of the presidency of the United States and disrespectful of the challenges that we face as a country, as a people, to address who we are — a nation of immigrants.”

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in her office at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, April 10, 2019.

The idea of pressing immigration authorities to embrace the plan was discussed in November and then again in February as the Trump administration struggled with a surge of migrants at the border, according to three people who spoke on condition of anonymity to outline private conversations. Homeland Security and ICE lawyers quickly rejected the proposal, according to the people, and it was dropped on the grounds that it was too expensive and a misuse of funds, one official said.

Earlier Friday, both the Department of Homeland Security and a White House official had insisted, in nearly identical statements, that the plan was dead on arrival.

“This was just a suggestion that was floated and rejected, which ended any further discussion,” the White House official said.

But not, apparently, by the president, who revived the idea in his tweets.

The plan, which was first reported by the Washington Post, is one of many ideas considered by an increasingly frustrated White House in recent months as Trump has railed against the growing number of Central American migrant families crossing the southern border and looked for new ways to increase leverage on congressional Democrats to change laws that Trump insists are making the problem worse.

Officials say they are running out of options, and have proposed and recycled numerous ideas that have never come to fruition. Trump in recent weeks has discussed the idea of renewing his administration’s controversial family separation policy. And he and aides are weighing forcing asylum-seeking families to choose between being detained together as their cases make their way through the courts or sending their children to government-run shelters.

There were at least two versions of the sanctuary city plan that were considered, according to one of the people familiar with the effort. One would have moved people who had already been detailed and were being held elsewhere to places with Democratic opponents of the president, while the other would have transported migrants apprehended at the border directly to San Francisco, New York City, Chicago and other spots.

Revelation of the idea drew immediate condemnation on Friday from Pelosi and other Democrats.

The No. 2 House Democrat, Steny Hoyer of Maryland, criticized the idea of using ICE or any other federal agency “to penalize” or as “retribution for political reasons.”

“That’s not the act of a democratic government,” he said.

And Rep. Bennie Thompson, D- Mississippi, who chairs the House Homeland Security committee, said: “The fact that this idea was even considered – not once but twice – serves as a reminder that the Trump Administration’s reckless immigration agenda is not about keeping the country safe, but about partisan politics and wantonly inflicting cruelty. ”

Former ICE Deputy Director Matt Albence, who on Friday was announced as the agency’s acting director, denied that the White House pressured immigration officials to implement the idea.

“I was asked my opinion and provided it, and my advice was heeded,” he said in a statement.

The Department of Health and Human Services said this week that it had started scouting vacant properties that could be turned into facilities for holding migrant children in several cities, including Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Phoenix, and San Antonio.

Those facilities would be licensed by each state and likely take several months to be approved and opened, separating them from the rapidly-expanding emergency shelter at Homestead, Florida, and the now-closed tent facility at Tornillo, Texas.

The Defence Department has also been reviewing a number of military bases to find a location that can house up to 5,000 unaccompanied migrant children as the U.S. braces for a surge of people crossing the U.S.-Mexico border this spring. Health and Human Services submitted the request for space last month, as Homeland Security leaders warned that tens of thousands of families were crossing the border each month. HHS has traditionally been responsible for providing temporary shelter to unaccompanied migrant children crossing the border.

ICE is tasked with arresting people living in the country illegally — including some who have been here for decades. Under the Trump administration, ICE has significantly stepped up arrests, including of people who have no U.S. criminal records.

In response, some cities have banished ICE from jails where agents could easily pick up immigration violators. Police in New York, Baltimore and Seattle rarely, if ever, disclose information about when suspected criminals in the U.S. illegally will be released from custody.

During his tenure at the Justice Department, Trump’s former Attorney General Jeff Sessions went after sanctuary cities, threatening to cut off their federal funding.

Democrats have said they will tackle immigration bills, possibly as soon as they return from their spring recess, and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell has indicated an interest in working on the issue.

McConnell on Thursday called for bipartisan talks aimed at bolstering asylum laws and addressing border security.

“What we need to do is sit down in a serious, adult, bipartisan basis and try to fix the problem, because the problem is pretty obvious,” McConnell, R-Ky., told reporters. “Border security is a part of it, but that doesn’t solve the asylum issue, and that can’t be solved, I don’t think, without some kind of statutory adjustment.”

@repost Family Law Litigation

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source https://canoe.com/news/world/donald-trump-says-he-may-send-illegal-immigrants-to-democrat-districts

By The Wall of Law April 12, 2019 Off

033019-Trump_Immigration

033019-Trump_Immigration

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said Friday he is considering sending “Illegal Immigrants” to Democratic strongholds to punish congressional foes for inaction on border security — just hours after White House and Homeland Security officials insisted the idea had been rejected as fast as it had been brought up.

“Due to the fact that Democrats are unwilling to change our very dangerous immigration laws, we are indeed, as reported, giving strong considerations to placing Illegal Immigrants in Sanctuary Cities only,” Trump tweeted. He added that, “The Radical Left always seems to have an Open Borders, Open Arms policy – so this should make them very happy!”

The tweets, which appeared to catch officials at the Department of Homeland Security by surprise, came as critics were blasting news that the White House had at least twice considered a plan to release detained immigrants into so-called sanctuary cities. Critics branded the plan, supposedly rejected, as an effort to use migrants as pawns to go after political opponents.

“Sanctuary cities” are places where local authorities do not co-operate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials, denying information or resources that would help ICE round up for deportation people living in the country illegally.

They include New York City and San Francisco, home city of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who on Friday called the idea “unworthy of the presidency of the United States and disrespectful of the challenges that we face as a country, as a people, to address who we are — a nation of immigrants.”

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in her office at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, April 10, 2019.

The idea of pressing immigration authorities to embrace the plan was discussed in November and then again in February as the Trump administration struggled with a surge of migrants at the border, according to three people who spoke on condition of anonymity to outline private conversations. Homeland Security and ICE lawyers quickly rejected the proposal, according to the people, and it was dropped on the grounds that it was too expensive and a misuse of funds, one official said.

Earlier Friday, both the Department of Homeland Security and a White House official had insisted, in nearly identical statements, that the plan was dead on arrival.

“This was just a suggestion that was floated and rejected, which ended any further discussion,” the White House official said.

But not, apparently, by the president, who revived the idea in his tweets.

The plan, which was first reported by the Washington Post, is one of many ideas considered by an increasingly frustrated White House in recent months as Trump has railed against the growing number of Central American migrant families crossing the southern border and looked for new ways to increase leverage on congressional Democrats to change laws that Trump insists are making the problem worse.

Officials say they are running out of options, and have proposed and recycled numerous ideas that have never come to fruition. Trump in recent weeks has discussed the idea of renewing his administration’s controversial family separation policy. And he and aides are weighing forcing asylum-seeking families to choose between being detained together as their cases make their way through the courts or sending their children to government-run shelters.

There were at least two versions of the sanctuary city plan that were considered, according to one of the people familiar with the effort. One would have moved people who had already been detailed and were being held elsewhere to places with Democratic opponents of the president, while the other would have transported migrants apprehended at the border directly to San Francisco, New York City, Chicago and other spots.

Revelation of the idea drew immediate condemnation on Friday from Pelosi and other Democrats.

The No. 2 House Democrat, Steny Hoyer of Maryland, criticized the idea of using ICE or any other federal agency “to penalize” or as “retribution for political reasons.”

“That’s not the act of a democratic government,” he said.

And Rep. Bennie Thompson, D- Mississippi, who chairs the House Homeland Security committee, said: “The fact that this idea was even considered – not once but twice – serves as a reminder that the Trump Administration’s reckless immigration agenda is not about keeping the country safe, but about partisan politics and wantonly inflicting cruelty. ”

Former ICE Deputy Director Matt Albence, who on Friday was announced as the agency’s acting director, denied that the White House pressured immigration officials to implement the idea.

“I was asked my opinion and provided it, and my advice was heeded,” he said in a statement.

The Department of Health and Human Services said this week that it had started scouting vacant properties that could be turned into facilities for holding migrant children in several cities, including Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Phoenix, and San Antonio.

Those facilities would be licensed by each state and likely take several months to be approved and opened, separating them from the rapidly-expanding emergency shelter at Homestead, Florida, and the now-closed tent facility at Tornillo, Texas.

The Defence Department has also been reviewing a number of military bases to find a location that can house up to 5,000 unaccompanied migrant children as the U.S. braces for a surge of people crossing the U.S.-Mexico border this spring. Health and Human Services submitted the request for space last month, as Homeland Security leaders warned that tens of thousands of families were crossing the border each month. HHS has traditionally been responsible for providing temporary shelter to unaccompanied migrant children crossing the border.

ICE is tasked with arresting people living in the country illegally — including some who have been here for decades. Under the Trump administration, ICE has significantly stepped up arrests, including of people who have no U.S. criminal records.

In response, some cities have banished ICE from jails where agents could easily pick up immigration violators. Police in New York, Baltimore and Seattle rarely, if ever, disclose information about when suspected criminals in the U.S. illegally will be released from custody.

During his tenure at the Justice Department, Trump’s former Attorney General Jeff Sessions went after sanctuary cities, threatening to cut off their federal funding.

Democrats have said they will tackle immigration bills, possibly as soon as they return from their spring recess, and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell has indicated an interest in working on the issue.

McConnell on Thursday called for bipartisan talks aimed at bolstering asylum laws and addressing border security.

“What we need to do is sit down in a serious, adult, bipartisan basis and try to fix the problem, because the problem is pretty obvious,” McConnell, R-Ky., told reporters. “Border security is a part of it, but that doesn’t solve the asylum issue, and that can’t be solved, I don’t think, without some kind of statutory adjustment.”

@repost How to File for Divorce

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source https://canoe.com/news/world/donald-trump-says-he-may-send-illegal-immigrants-to-democrat-districts

By The Wall of Law April 12, 2019 Off

Ford government slashes budget of Legal Aid Ontario by 30 per cent

TORONTO — The Progressive Conservative government is slashing the budget of Legal Aid Ontario, including eliminating funding for refugee and immigration law services — a move lawyers with the organization call a “horrific” decimation.

Legal Aid Ontario sent a letter to staff Thursday as the government tabled its first budget, saying the province is reducing funding to the organization by 30 per cent.

That means it will receive $133 million less in this fiscal year than the $456 million it had anticipated.

The budget says “streamlining the delivery of legal aid to promote long-term sustainability” is expected to reduce the funding by $164 million in 2021-22.

Dana Fisher, a legal aid lawyer herself and a spokeswoman for the union representing 350 Legal Aid Ontario lawyers, said it’s hard to see how cutting a third of the organization’s budget can be accomplished through “streamlining.”

“A cut of that nature is going to be horrific at any point in time, but the nature of it starting immediately is just going to cause ripples throughout the justice system,” she said.

“You’re looking at immediate impacts to defending people’s rights to liberty, to access to justice, to people being able to fight for custody to their children and access to their children, including women who are fleeing domestic violence.”

Legal Aid CEO David Field said in the letter to staff that the province has indicated it will no longer fund refugee and immigration law services, “outside of any potential transition costs.”

“As a result, LAO will need to determine how to continue the refugee program within the current federal funding allocation,” he wrote. “We are working on a range of options and will keep you informed.”

Fisher said the funding cut will put lives at risk.

“From the immigration perspective, these are individuals who are facing extradition and torture and persecution and these are real lives that are going to suffer as a result of these cuts,” she said.

Attorney General Caroline Mulroney did not respond to a request for comment.

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source https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/ford-government-slashes-budget-of-legal-aid-ontario-by-30-per-cent-1.4377372

By The Wall of Law April 12, 2019 Off

Shock at arrest of deputy’s son in black church fires

OPELOUSAS, La. — Authorities said he had no known criminal record. A friend described him as an introverted animal lover who showed no animosity toward any race, and a talented, if frustrated heavy metal guitar player and singer. A fellow musician called him “a really sweet guy.”

But Holden Matthews, the white, 21-year-old son of a Louisiana sheriff’s deputy, was behind bars Thursday, accused of torching three century old African American churches during a 10-day period in and around Opelousas. The city of 16,000 people was set on edge by blazes, which evoked memories of civil rights terrorism.

A fragment of a charred gasoline can, surveillance video that captured what appeared to be his parents’ truck in key locations, debit card records and cellphone tracking techniques led authorities to arrest Matthews without incident Wednesday evening. But though the arrest affidavit showed how they linked Matthews to the crime, federal, state and local authorities who gathered for a Thursday news conference at the St. Landry Parish Sheriff’s Office weren’t ready to discuss motive.

Eric Rommal, the agent in charge of the New Orleans FBI office, said investigators were still looking into whether the fires were “bias motivated.”

Matthews had a defender in Nygyl Bryyn, a Facebook friend who identified himself as a south Louisiana native, musician, entrepreneur and owner of the independent record label Power Back Productions. In a telephone interview from Los Angeles, Brynn described Matthews as a talented, sometimes frustrated musician — upset in recent months after Brynn told him he needed to improve the quality of his recordings — but not a racist or violent person.

“If he’s making a statement it’s against religion and establishment only, not against race,” Bryyn said in a telephone interview, later adding, “I don’t think he did it but if he did it would not be because the churches are black.”

Bryyn, 36, and a native of Opelousas, said he met Matthews after moving out of state when Matthews, who played guitar and sang, answered an online ad while seeking a recording deal with Bryyn’s Power Back Productions. They worked together and met face to face over the years. Matthews was at odds with his parents over his music aspirations, Bryyn said, but never showed signs of violence or racism.

Matthews had shown interest in “black metal,” an extreme subgenre of heavy metal, state Fire Marshall Butch Browning said. The music has been linked, in some instances, to fires at Christian churches in Norway in the 1990s.

A Facebook page that appeared to belong to Matthews showed him with the words “black metal” spray painted on a wall behind him. He also posted a comment on a movie’s portrayal of black metal musician Varg Vikernes, a far-right figure convicted of manslaughter and arson at three churches.

Black metal lyrics often espouse satanism and paganism, and a few bands feature neo-Nazi beliefs.

Bryyn, however, bristled at the notion that the black metal genre is characterized by racism. He acknowledged that some, but not all, involved in black metal music may have expressed racism, but he said it’s not typical of the genre.

“We’ve got friends of all races,” he said.

Josh Cook, 27, a musician from Hammond, Louisiana, said he heard about the church burnings before Matthews’ arrest and had wondered if they could have been inspired by the church fires in Norway. He said there is an “elitist” element of the black metal music scene that is fascinated with those church burnings.

But he echoed Bryyn’s description of Matthews, saying the suspect was friends with a very diverse group of people and a “good dude” who never displayed signs of racism.

“He is actually a really sweet guy, which is why I was so surprised to hear what happened,” Cook said. “He was not a jerk. He was very tolerant. He was very loving and very encouraging.”

Matthews’ father, Roy Matthews, “broke down” when told his son was the suspect, said Sheriff Bobby Guidroz.

Guidroz said the father aided authorities by arranging for the son to leave the house and go to a place where he could be arrested without incident. He did not elaborate.

The younger Matthews was arrested on three counts of arson of a religious building. A conviction could bring up to 15 years in prison on each count, Browning said.

The fires set many people on edge in and around Opelousas, about 140 miles (225 kilometres) northwest of New Orleans.

Gov. John Bel Edwards said the fires were “especially painful” because they were a reminder “of a very dark past of intimidation and fear.”

“This is a reflection of one depraved individual,” he added. “It is not a reflection on the state of Louisiana.”

An Associated Press reporter was turned away Thursday from what was believed to be the home the suspect shared with his parents.

Matthews’ arrest came a little more than two weeks after the first blaze torched the St. Mary Baptist Church on March 26 in Port Barre, a town just outside of Opelousas. Days later, the Greater Union Baptist Church and Mount Pleasant Baptist Church in Opelousas were burned. Each was more than 100 years old.

The churches were empty at the time, and no one was injured.

The Rev. Harry Richard, pastor of Greater Union Baptist Church, which was destroyed, said the arrest put him at ease and let him sleep at night.

“I felt relieved my congregation didn’t have to worry anymore,” said Richard, who was told of the arrest late Wednesday. “I was reassured that law enforcement was on our side, that things were finally coming to an end.”

___

McGill reported from New Orleans and Opelousas. Associated Press writers Stacey Plaisance in Opelousas, and Michael Kunzelman in College Park, Maryland, contributed to this report.

Kevin McGill And Melinda Deslatte, The Associated Press

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source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/04/12/shock-at-arrest-of-deputys-son-in-black-church-fires/

By The Wall of Law April 12, 2019 Off