Day: May 24, 2019

Mississippi rep charged with punching wife could be removed

JACKSON, Miss. — The Mississippi House speaker said Friday that he is asking lawyers to research how to remove a lawmaker if it’s true that the man punched his own wife and does not resign voluntarily.

Second-term Republican Rep. Doug McLeod of Lucedale was arrested and charged with misdemeanour domestic violence after deputies were called to his home late Saturday.

George County sheriff’s deputies said McLeod, 58, was drunk and bloodied his wife’s nose after she didn’t undress quickly enough when he wanted to have sex.

Republican Speaker Philip Gunn said Friday that the House Ethics Committee will “closely monitor this case.”

“Finally, if the allegations prove to be true, I have requested the House legal staff to research the correct process for the removal of the member if he does not voluntarily resign,” Gunn said in a statement.

Section 55 of the Mississippi Constitution says each chamber of the Legislature may each “punish its members for disorderly behaviour” and with a two-thirds vote may expel one of its own members.

The Legislature has already finished its work for this year and will only return to the Capitol if the governor calls them into special session.

McLeod has not responded to numerous messages from The Associated Press or other news outlets. He was released from jail by Monday on a $1,000 “signature bond,” which meant he did not have to post that amount of money.

Earlier this week, Gunn, Republican Gov. Phil Bryant and Mississippi Republican Party chairman Lucien Smith all said McLeod should resign if the charge of domestic violence is true. Some Democratic lawmakers have also called for his resignation. Republicans hold a majority in the Mississippi House and Senate.

McLeod has represented George and Stone counties in south Mississippi since 2012 and is unopposed for reelection this year.

In 2017, McLeod was among the majority of legislators who voted to enact a law making domestic abuse a reason for divorce in Mississippi.

Emily Wagster Pettus, The Associated Press

@repost Separation Lawyer

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source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/05/24/mississippi-rep-charged-with-punching-wife-could-be-removed/

By The Wall of Law May 24, 2019 Off

Manitoba First Nation Children Sexually, Physically Abused: RCMP

An RCMP cruiser is seen here in New Brunswick. Mounties say they interviewed or assessed more than 150 children in an investigation into an Indigenous community in northeastern Manitoba.

WINNIPEG — Two men and a foster mother have been charged following an investigation that police say found at least 17 children who were sexually and physically abused in a Manitoba Indigenous community.

“This is absolutely horrific allegations,” Families Minister Heather Stefanson said Thursday. “Certainly, our thoughts and prayers and sympathies go out to all the children and the communities and the families that are affected.”

 

RCMP said they received three complaints between December 2017 and June 2018 that children from the Garden Hill First Nation had been sexually assaulted.

In February 2018, Paul Bruce Harper was charged with multiple sexual offences.

‘Increasingly concerned’

Supt. Michael Koppang, who oversees the RCMP’s Major Crime Services, said officers learned that Harper had access to a foster home in the fly-in community in northeastern Manitoba. It became clear the investigation was about to get a lot larger.

“We became increasingly concerned that there was a potential for more victims due to the number of children who were in the care of this foster home throughout the years,” Koppang said at a news conference at RCMP headquarters in Winnipeg.

Mounties worked with Child and Family Services and interviewed or assessed more than 150 children.

After an 11-month investigation, officers determined 14 other children between three and 15 may have been sexually and physically abused between 2011 and 2017.

We recognize the possibility that there may be more children that were victimized that have not yet been identified.RCMP Supt. Michael Koppang

A 20-year-old man, who cannot be named because the alleged offences happened when he was a youth, now faces multiple charges of sexual assault, sexual interference and assault with a weapon.

The foster mother, whom police identified as Lucy Harper, 66, is charged with perjury and failing to report a child in need of protection. She is no longer a foster parent.

The two men are in custody, but the woman is not.

Children coming forward

Koppang said he could not give more details or say how the foster mother and accused are known to each other. He said the investigation continues and more children could come forward.

“Despite our comprehensive search for victims with over 150 interviews, we recognize the possibility that there may be more children that were victimized that have not yet been identified,” he said.

Grand Chief Garrison Settee, who represents northern First Nations, said governments and police must ensure that the young people have access to support.

Arlen Dumas, grand chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, said he was shocked by the arrests and number of children thought to be involved. He said it is not an isolated problem.

It’s clear that the overall issue of child welfare needs to be addressed in the province, Dumas said.

There are more than 10,000 children in care in Manitoba and about 90 per cent are Indigenous.

“I want to send out the message to the victims as well. It’s not their fault that this happened,” he said.

“I hope that they don’t take any blame or that they feel that anything that they have done facilitated whatever may have happened to them.”

@repost Types of Custody

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source https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/garden-hill-first-nation-child-abuse_ca_5ce752f1e4b0a2f9f28c50a8

By The Wall of Law May 24, 2019 Off

Theresa May: A prime minister defined and defeated by Brexit

LONDON — Theresa May became prime minister in 2016 with one overriding goal: to lead Britain out of the European Union.

Three years on, the U.K. is still in the EU, and May’s time in 10 Downing St. is ending. She announced Friday that she will step down as Conservative leader on June 7, remaining as caretaker prime minister during a party leadership contest to choose her successor.

She will be remembered as the latest in a long line of Conservative leaders destroyed by the party’s divisions over Europe, and as a prime minister who failed in her primary mission. But history may also see her as a leader who faced a devilishly difficult situation with stubborn determination.

The daughter of a rural Anglican vicar, May attended Oxford University and worked in financial services before being elected to Parliament in 1997.

She was quiet and diligent, but also ambitious. One university friend later recalled that May hoped to be Britain’s first female prime minister, and “was quite irritated when Margaret Thatcher got there first.”

She was not a natural political campaigner; her stiff public appearances as prime minister landed her the nickname “The Maybot.” Her only touches of flamboyance are a fondness for bold outfits and accessories like brightly patterned kitten-heel shoes.

But she soon established a reputation for solid competence and a knack for vanquishing flashier rivals.

May served for six years in the notoriously thankless job of home secretary, responsible for borders, immigration and law and order. In 2016, she beat flashier and better-known politicians, including Brexit-backer Boris Johnson — now the favourite to succeed her — to become Britain’s second female prime minister, after Margaret Thatcher.

May was the surprise winner of a Conservative leadership contest triggered when Prime Minister David Cameron stepped down after voters rejected his advice to remain in the EU, instead voting 52%-48% to leave.

In her first speech as prime minister in July 2016, May sketched out plans for an ambitious policy agenda. She spoke of giving the poor a helping hand and lifting barriers to social mobility.

But Brexit soon crowded out almost all other policies.

Like Cameron, May had campaigned to remain, but in office she became a champion of Brexit. “Brexit means Brexit” became her mantra — a meaningless one, said her detractors, as it emerged that undoing 45 years of ties with the bloc would be a fraught and complex process.

Attempting to win the support of Conservative Brexiteers suspicious of her past pro-EU leanings, May set out firm red lines in negotiations with the EU: Britain would leave the bloc’s single market and customs union and end the right of EU citizens to live and work in the U.K.

For a time, May’s resolve helped her unite the warring factions of her party, which for decades has been divided over policy toward Europe.

But she then gambled on a snap election in June 2017, in an attempt to bolster her slim majority in Parliament and strengthen her hand in Brexit negotiations with the EU.

The move backfired. May ran a lacklustre campaign on a platform that included plans to cut benefits to pensioners and change the way they pay for long-term care — quickly dubbed a “dementia tax.” The Conservatives lost their majority, and May had to strike a deal with 10 lawmakers from Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party to stay in power.

The DUP’s support became a complication when the border between Northern Ireland and EU member Ireland emerged as a major issue in Brexit negotiations. The unionist party strongly opposed special measures to ensure the border remained free of customs posts and other barriers, worrying they might weaken the bonds between Northern Ireland and the rest of the U.K.

May pressed on and in November 2018 struck a divorce agreement with the EU, setting out the terms of Britain’s departure and establishing a transition period of almost two years for the two sides to work out their future relations.

All that remained was for the British and European Parliaments to ratify it. And that is where May’s best-laid plans came undone.

Her careful compromise of an agreement was rejected by both sides of the Brexit debate. Brexiteers felt it gave too much away and left Britain bound to EU rules. Pro-EU lawmakers wanted a softer Brexit that kept close economic ties to the bloc. In January, May’s deal was rejected by 230 votes, the biggest government defeat in British parliamentary history.

Whatever her flaws, May was no quitter. Late last year she likened herself to Geoffrey Boycott, a cricketer who was famous for his dull but effective batting style.

“Geoffrey Boycott stuck to it and he got the runs in the end,” she said.

She tried again to get her Brexit deal approved, losing by 149 votes. A third attempt narrowed the margin of defeat to 48.

She tried talks with the Labour Party about securing a compromise, but managed only to further alienate her own lawmakers with her concessions to the opposition. A promise to let Parliament vote on whether to hold a new EU membership referendum was the final straw.

By this time, a growing number of Conservatives had concluded that May was the problem and would have to leave before Brexit could be sorted out.

But she resisted the pressure, planning instead to try for a fourth time by bringing a withdrawal agreement bill to Parliament for a vote.

In the end, the pressure became irresistible.

Jill Lawless, The Associated Press

@repost Divorce Procedure

Via Family Law Center

source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/05/24/theresa-may-a-prime-minister-defined-and-defeated-by-brexit/

By The Wall of Law May 24, 2019 Off

British PM Theresa May announces resignation

Theresa May announced Friday that she will step down as U.K. Conservative Party leader on June 7, admitting defeat in her attempt to take Britain out of the European Union and sparking a contest to become the country’s next prime minister.

She will stay as caretaker prime minister until the new leader is chosen, a process likely to take several weeks. The new Conservative leader would then become prime minister without the need for a general election.

Her voice breaking, May said in a televised statement outside 10 Downing St. that she would soon be leaving a job that it has been “the honour of my life to hold.”

May became prime minister the month after Britons voted in June 2016 to leave the European Union, and her premiership has been consumed by the attempt to deliver on that verdict.

Now she has bowed to relentless pressure from her party to quit over her failure to take Britain out of the EU on the scheduled date of March 29. Britain is currently due to leave the EU on Oct. 31, but Parliament has yet to approve divorce terms.

“I feel as certain today as I did three years ago that in a democracy, if you give people a choice you have a duty to implement what they decide,” May said.

“I have done my best to do that. … But it is now clear to me that it is in the best interests of the country for a new prime minister to lead that effort.”

Her departure will trigger a party leadership contest in which any Conservative lawmaker can run. The early front-runner is Boris Johnson, a former foreign secretary and strong champion of Brexit.

Conservative lawmakers increasingly see May as an obstacle to Britain’s EU exit, although her replacement will face the same issue: a Parliament deeply divided over whether to leave the EU, and how close a relationship to seek with the bloc after it does.

Pressure on May reached critical point this week as House of Commons Leader Andrea Leadsom quit and several Cabinet colleagues expressed doubts about her Brexit bill.

With her authority draining away by the hour, May on Thursday delayed plans to publish the EU withdrawal bill — her fourth attempt to secure Parliament’s backing for her Brexit blueprint.

Leadsom, another likely contender to replace May, joined colleagues in paying tribute to the departing leader. She tweeted that May’s “dignified speech” had been “an illustration of her total commitment to country and duty. She did her utmost, and I wish her all the very best.”

Johnson, whose relentless criticism helped push May out of the door, tweeted: “Thank you for your stoical service to our country and the Conservative Party. It is now time to follow her urgings: to come together and deliver Brexit.”

The Associated Press’ Gregory Katz contributed to this story.

@repost Child Support Arrears

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source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/05/24/theresa-may-resignation/

By The Wall of Law May 24, 2019 Off

The Latest: May to step down as party leader on June 7

LONDON — The Latest on Brexit and Britain’s political crisis (all times local):

10:05 a.m.

Theresa May says she will step down as U.K. Conservative Party leader on June 7, sparking a contest to become Britain’s next prime minister.

She will stay as caretaker prime minister until the new leader is chosen, a process likely to take several weeks.

May has bowed to relentless pressure from her party to quit over her failure to take Britain out of the European Union on schedule.

Her departure will trigger a party leadership contest in which any Conservative lawmaker can run. The early front-runner is Boris Johnson, a former foreign secretary and strong champion of Brexit.

Britain is currently due to leave the EU on Oct. 31, but Parliament has yet to approve divorce terms.

___

8:55 a.m.

British Prime Minister Theresa May is meeting a leader of her Conservative lawmakers amid mounting speculation that she is about to announce her departure date.

The party’s key backbench committee has set a showdown meeting Friday for May to agree to leave soon or face a leadership challenge.

Pressure on May to quit over her failure to get Parliament’s approval for a European Union divorce deal reached critical point this week as a senior minister quit and several Cabinet colleagues expressed doubts about her Brexit bill.

Several British media outlets reported that May would agree to give up the prime minister’s post June 10, sparking a Conservative leadership contest.

She could stay in office as a caretaker prime minister for several weeks until party lawmakers and members choose a successor.

The Associated Press

@repost Child Custody Agreement

Via Divorce and Spousal Support

source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/05/24/the-latest-may-to-step-down-as-party-leader-on-june-7/

By The Wall of Law May 24, 2019 Off