Day: August 26, 2019

Wrong-way driver gets 30 years to life for killing 5 teens

BURLINGTON, Vt. — A driver convicted of killing five teenagers in a wrong-way crash nearly three years ago in Vermont was sentenced Monday to 30 years to life in prison.

Steven Bourgoin was convicted of five counts of second-degree murder in May. He apologized to the families during the hourslong sentencing hearing.

The 38-year-old Bourgoinhas acknowledged that the vehicle he was driving collided with the car carrying the five teenagers in October 2016, but he argued he was insane at the time.

During the trial, psychiatrists said that in the days before the crash, Bourgoin thought he was on a secret mission, believed he was in danger and he thought he was getting signals from lights, radios and television static about what to do.

Prosecutors countered that Bourgoin was troubled at the time of the crash, grappling with custody of his child and relationship and financial issues, but he was not legally insane.

Bourgoin left home the night of the crash, got onto an interstate going south and then turned around and started heading north in the southbound lane at around 90 miles per hour (145 kilometres per hour), police said. He collided with the car that carried the teenagers in Williston, Vermont.

The crash killed Mary Harris, 16, of Moretown; Cyrus Zschau, 16, of Moretown; Liam Hale, 16, of Fayston; Janie Cozzi, 15, of Fayston; and Eli Brookens, 16, of Waterbury.

At the emotional hearing Monday, parents of the teenagers said Bourgoin stole their children from all those who loved them and that he must show accountability for what he has done.

One father said he must forgive Bourgoin so he can be like his own daughter, who he described as having grace.

The mother of another victim told Bourgoin that there were no words to quantify what he took from her.

The judge noted that countless people have been victimized by Bourgoin’s actions, including first responders, relatives and the teens’ school community.

Bourgoin will received credit for time served of nearly three years.

The Associated Press

@repost Division of Assets

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source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/08/26/wrong-way-driver-gets-30-years-to-life-for-killing-5-teens/

By The Wall of Law August 26, 2019 Off

Different Parenting Styles? Here’s How To Get On The Same Page

In the journey to becoming parents, most couples decide if they want kids, and if so, when. There are often preliminary parenting discussions; what values and skills they want their children to acquire as they grow up in that family.

Yet few parents work out the specifics of how they will accomplish these goals. Then, when a baby arrives and has needs beyond feeding and diaper changing, differences in parenting styles can begin to appear, and one parent may strongly disagree with the other’s methods. 

WATCH: How to avoid parenting fights with your partner. Story continues below.

Halifax psychologist Dr. Elizabeth Church told HuffPost Canada most parents generally agree on what character traits and morals they’d like their kids to learn. Even if they do have differing objectives, it doesn’t have to be problematic if couples have ongoing, in-depth discussions and respect one another’s differences enough to make detailed strategies on how to accomplish joint parenting goals. 

“Parents need to continuously have conversations about their parenting approach,” Church said. “They need to keep asking one another ‘What do we want for our kids? What kind of people do we want our kids to become?’ And most importantly – ‘How do we get there?’ They just shouldn’t have these discussions in front of the kids.”

There’s a difference between parenting style and personality

It’s important to distinguish between parenting style and an individual parent’s personality, though. One parent may be playful and humourous in their personality and parenting approach, while the other is more serious, but that isn’t a negative parenting style difference if both parents are delivering the same core messages and similar consequences when needed.

It’s good for kids to experience different types of personalities at home. They even benefit from witnessing parents oppose one another on non-parenting matters, as long as it’s kept respectful. 

It's good for kids to hear differing opinions.

In a busy world, it can be hard for parents to find free time away from kids for regular parenting discussions. While it may not seem romantic, couple time alone can be an opportunity to touch base on shared parenting concerns.

Parents can also schedule a “parenting touch-base” appointment each week – Sunday morning coffee in bed with the door closed and kids occupied in some way, for example – to review the state of their parenting nation. Even texts or emails can keep parenting conflicts private from children.  

Oshawa, Ont. mom Heidi Grant-Roberts told HuffPost Canada she and her husband may disagree occasionally in front of their four kids, aged nine to 20, but expands, “We have a rule that if one of us gives a consequence the other doesn’t agree with, we will not mention or discuss it in front of the kids. We don’t want to undermine the other parent.”

Church endorses this wholeheartedly and says parental expectations of discipline and core values are probably the two most important discussions to hold away from kids.

Again, it’s critical to discuss in specific terms what family rules and boundaries should be, and find a compromise on discipline if there is a wide gap between ideas for consequences. 

“All parenting styles are not equally good; harsh parenting is a problem, as is an overly-permissive style,” Church said.

When to seek professional help

Despite efforts to work out conflict privately, it’s not always easy finding that middle ground with your spouse or co-parent. Church notes professional assistance from a family therapist or parenting support group is warranted in the following scenarios:

  • Marital problems, separation and divorce
  • Blending families
  • If a parent feels the other’s style is abusive in any way
  • If cultural differences aren’t being respected by both parents
  • If parents can’t agree on a child’s diagnosis or treatment plan for developmental, emotional or medical concerns
  • If a parent is undermining the other, especially with a child’s involvement. (i.e., asking a child to keep a secret from the other parent.)
  • If parenting disagreements are consistently spilling into family life (i.e., parents are openly hostile towards one another with kids around, or short-tempered with children from residual anger over unresolved parenting disputes.)
  • If either parent feels it’s necessary or that kids are being adversely affected.

Church warns studies have confirmed when parents have parenting conflicts in front of their children it can affect the kids’ emotional and physical health. Some children even end up blaming themselves for the disputes.

Nobody wants that outcome, so an extra effort to communicate and compromise in private has valuable payoffs in the end. 

@repost Domestic Agreement Cases

Via Family Law Property Division

source https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/parenting-styles-different-kids_ca_5d63e7bde4b02cc97c91114d

By The Wall of Law August 26, 2019 Off

Different Parenting Styles? Here’s How To Get On The Same Page

In the journey to becoming parents, most couples decide if they want kids, and if so, when. There are often preliminary parenting discussions; what values and skills they want their children to acquire as they grow up in that family.

Yet few parents work out the specifics of how they will accomplish these goals. Then, when a baby arrives and has needs beyond feeding and diaper changing, differences in parenting styles can begin to appear, and one parent may strongly disagree with the other’s methods. 

WATCH: How to avoid parenting fights with your partner. Story continues below.

Halifax psychologist Dr. Elizabeth Church told HuffPost Canada most parents generally agree on what character traits and morals they’d like their kids to learn. Even if they do have differing objectives, it doesn’t have to be problematic if couples have ongoing, in-depth discussions and respect one another’s differences enough to make detailed strategies on how to accomplish joint parenting goals. 

“Parents need to continuously have conversations about their parenting approach,” Church said. “They need to keep asking one another ‘What do we want for our kids? What kind of people do we want our kids to become?’ And most importantly – ‘How do we get there?’ They just shouldn’t have these discussions in front of the kids.”

There’s a difference between parenting style and personality

It’s important to distinguish between parenting style and an individual parent’s personality, though. One parent may be playful and humourous in their personality and parenting approach, while the other is more serious, but that isn’t a negative parenting style difference if both parents are delivering the same core messages and similar consequences when needed.

It’s good for kids to experience different types of personalities at home. They even benefit from witnessing parents oppose one another on non-parenting matters, as long as it’s kept respectful. 

It's good for kids to hear differing opinions.

In a busy world, it can be hard for parents to find free time away from kids for regular parenting discussions. While it may not seem romantic, couple time alone can be an opportunity to touch base on shared parenting concerns.

Parents can also schedule a “parenting touch-base” appointment each week – Sunday morning coffee in bed with the door closed and kids occupied in some way, for example – to review the state of their parenting nation. Even texts or emails can keep parenting conflicts private from children.  

Oshawa, Ont. mom Heidi Grant-Roberts told HuffPost Canada she and her husband may disagree occasionally in front of their four kids, aged nine to 20, but expands, “We have a rule that if one of us gives a consequence the other doesn’t agree with, we will not mention or discuss it in front of the kids. We don’t want to undermine the other parent.”

Church endorses this wholeheartedly and says parental expectations of discipline and core values are probably the two most important discussions to hold away from kids.

Again, it’s critical to discuss in specific terms what family rules and boundaries should be, and find a compromise on discipline if there is a wide gap between ideas for consequences. 

“All parenting styles are not equally good; harsh parenting is a problem, as is an overly-permissive style,” Church said.

When to seek professional help

Despite efforts to work out conflict privately, it’s not always easy finding that middle ground with your spouse or co-parent. Church notes professional assistance from a family therapist or parenting support group is warranted in the following scenarios:

  • Marital problems, separation and divorce
  • Blending families
  • If a parent feels the other’s style is abusive in any way
  • If cultural differences aren’t being respected by both parents
  • If parents can’t agree on a child’s diagnosis or treatment plan for developmental, emotional or medical concerns
  • If a parent is undermining the other, especially with a child’s involvement. (i.e., asking a child to keep a secret from the other parent.)
  • If parenting disagreements are consistently spilling into family life (i.e., parents are openly hostile towards one another with kids around, or short-tempered with children from residual anger over unresolved parenting disputes.)
  • If either parent feels it’s necessary or that kids are being adversely affected.

Church warns studies have confirmed when parents have parenting conflicts in front of their children it can affect the kids’ emotional and physical health. Some children even end up blaming themselves for the disputes.

Nobody wants that outcome, so an extra effort to communicate and compromise in private has valuable payoffs in the end. 

@repost Family Custody Lawyers

Via Joint Custody Child Support

source https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/parenting-styles-different-kids_ca_5d63e7bde4b02cc97c91114d

By The Wall of Law August 26, 2019 Off

Trump Defends Trudeau Meeting After Insult From Ezra Levant

OTTAWA — In the hellscape vortex of Twitter, Donald Trump and Ezra Levant’s worlds collided Sunday. 

It happened after Levant, founder of Rebel Media and outspoken conservative commentator, criticized Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s posture in a photo from the G7 summit in Biarritz, France. 

“Just look at this picture. Even a child would know who is in control,” wrote Levant.

The post found its way to the president of the United States, who seemingly disagreed with Levant’s characterization of the bilateral meeting.

After getting dunked by Trump, Rebel Media’s self-titled “commander” took the opportunity to thank POTUS for reviving the Keystone XL pipeline — before taking a dig at the CBC after getting mocked by “This Hour Has 22 Minutes” star Mark Critch.

Trudeau and Trump met on the sidelines of the G7 summit to further discuss the new North American trade deal set to replace NAFTA. Talks have continued between the two countries because only Mexico has ratified the deal. 

The two leaders also talked about the detention of Canadians Michael Korvig and Michael Spavor in China, as well as the protests in Hong Kong, according to a readout of the two leaders’ meeting released by the Prime Minister’s Office.

On Monday, Trudeau downplayed suggestions of tense relations between the U.S. and other G7 countries, calling meetings “very productive.”

Conservatives in Canada distancing themselves from Rebel Media

Many Canadian conservatives have distanced themselves from Rebel Media since the right-wing outlet’s controversial coverage of the violent “Unite The Right” rally in Charlottesville, Va. two years ago.

A woman was killed and almost 20 people were injured after neo-Nazi James Alex Fields Jr. drove a car into a crowd of anti-racist protesters. Fields Jr. was later sentenced to life in prison.

Rebel correspondent Faith Goldy was in Charlottesville at the time and was fired by Levant after making comments sympathetic to white supremacists on a Daily Stormer podcast.

WATCH: Facebook grilled on Faith Goldy flip flop

 

Goldy, who would later launch a mayoral bid in Toronto and find herself banned from Facebook for espousing hate, praised the “well thought out ideas” written in neo-Nazi leader Richard Spencer’s manifesto. Spencer was a key organizer of the racist rally that turned deadly.

Goldy’s comments prompted some Conservative MPs to draw the line with Rebel Media. Wellington—Halton Hills MP Michael Chong, who has accused the media organization of “spewing anti-Muslim and anti-semitic sentiments, pledged to not do interviews with Levant’s outlet in the future.

Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer, who sat down for interviews with The Rebel in the past, did not immediately blacklist Rebel Media. Scheer told reporters at the time that he would refuse interview requests from Levant’s outline “as the editorial direction of that particular institution remains as it is.”

Scheer’s leadership campaign was managed by Hamish Marshall, a former board member of Rebel Media. Marshall, who is serving as the Conservative campaign manager this fall, told Maclean’s his role with the website was limited to technical services and that he “never had any involvement in any editorial or content decisions.”

Also on HuffPost

@repost Domestic Agreement Contract

Via Divorce Settlement Agreement

source https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/donald-trump-ezra-levant_ca_5d64044fe4b0b034ea004432

By The Wall of Law August 26, 2019 Off