Day: August 28, 2019

Ontario man who tried to fatally burn his girlfriend and her kids handed higher sentence

The Court of Appeal for Ontario says a man convicted of attempted murder for setting his girlfriend’s house on fire and trying to trap her and two of her children inside will now face a sentence of 20 years with credit for the time he served in pre-sentence custody.

The province’s Court of Appeal nearly doubled the 11-year sentence imposed on Windsor man Kenneth Kormendy, calling the initial penalty inadequate and “demonstrably unfit.”

@repost Spousal Support Agreement

Via Divorce Splitting Assets

source https://www.therecord.com/news-story/9571347-ontario-man-who-tried-to-fatally-burn-his-girlfriend-and-her-kids-handed-higher-sentence/

By The Wall of Law August 28, 2019 Off

Ontario Government Takes Carbon Tax Fight To The Supreme Court

Ontario Premier Doug Ford speaks at a press conference in Toronto on Aug. 23, 2019.

TORONTO — The Ontario government is appealing to the Supreme Court of Canada for a decision on whether or not the federal government’s carbon tax is constitutional.

“In June, we were disappointed to learn that in a split decision, the Ontario Court of Appeal did not accept our position that the federal carbon tax is unconstitutional,” Ontario Environment Minister Jeff Yurek said in a statement Wednesday.

“Despite this decision, we remain committed to using every tool at our disposal to fight against the job-killing carbon tax … That is why we filed our appeal of the decision on the carbon tax to the Supreme Court of Canada today.”

Ontario Premier Doug Ford has spoken out against Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s carbon tax regularly since taking power last summer. 

He often calls it “the worst tax ever” and his government is spending $30 million to fight the tax with the court challenge and advertisements.

Earlier: Ontario NDP blasts Ford’s court challenge of Ottawa’s carbon tax. Story continues after the video.

 

Ford’s government is also forcing every gas station in the province to display stickers that say “the federal carbon tax will cost you.” 

The stickers fail to mention that 90 per cent of the revenue collected through the carbon tax is being rebated back to Canadians. Most families are expected to collect more in rebates than they lose to the tax, according to an analysis done by the federal government’s independent budget watchdog. 

In Ontario, the tax is expected to cost the average family $256 a year; the same family’s rebate would be $300. 

This carbon tax, it’s not going to be the courts that are going to decide.Premier Doug Ford

On Friday, Ford indicated that his government might abandon the court challenge altogether if Trudeau wins the federal election in October. 

“This carbon tax, it’s not going to be the courts that are going to decide. The people are going to decide when the election is held,” Ford said.

“Once the people decide, I believe in democracy, I respect democracy, we move on.”

Federal Conservative leader Andrew Scheer has said that he will repeal the tax if he wins power. 

The provincial governments in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta are also challenging the carbon tax in court.

After multiple rulings upheld the federal government’s tax, Liberal MPs urged those provinces to drop their challenges. 

Conservative premiers are wasting millions of dollars in court “fighting climate action rather than fighting climate change,” Liberal MP Sean Fraser said in July.

Trudeau argues that the tax is key to his government’s climate change policy. 

During the court battle with Ontario, lawyers for the federal Liberal government argued that the tax gives people an incentive to reduce their emissions and therefore is a legitimate answer to the potentially devastating impacts of climate change. 

If governments around the world don’t cut out carbon emissions completely by 2050, there could be mass food shortages and a spike in floods, droughts and storms, according to research backed by the United Nations.

The panel of UN scientists called for “rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society” in a watershed report on climate change released last August.

With files from the Canadian Press

Also on HuffPost

@repost Divorce and Property Settlement

Via Attorney Separation Agreement

source https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/ontario-carbon-tax-supreme-court_ca_5d66c5dbe4b01fcc690e016d

By The Wall of Law August 28, 2019 Off

Tory confusion reopens the question of ‘not reopening’ debates

Welcome to a sneak peek of the Maclean’s Politics Insider newsletter. Sign-up at the bottom of the page to get it delivered straight to your inbox.

Reopening the question what ‘not reopening’ means: Questions about Andrew Scheer’s stand on abortion have dogged him going back to his winning run for the Conservative leadership in 2017. He’s often repeated a clear pledge that if he was prime minister, his government would “not reopen this issue.” But would his let a Conservative MP propose an anti-abortion measure as a private member’s initiative? His Quebec lieutenant, MP Alain Rayes, said Tory MPs wouldn’t have that freedom—then had to recant. But Scheer himself hasn’t addressed the matter in plain language, leaving him open to Liberal attacks. Andrew MacDougall, who was on the staff of former prime minister Stephen Harper when he was keeping issues like abortion and same-sex marriage (on which Scheer has also come under unflattering scrutiny lately) from bursting into flame, wrote in his must-read Maclean’s column on what makes him uneasy:

“I’m listening to the Liberals because I look at Andrew Scheer and can’t quite take the measure of the man. Other people I speak with can’t either. Call us Red Tories. Call us whatever. We’re the people who believed it when Harper said the social conservative bits were permanently off the agenda but can’t quite buy the same lines coming out of Scheer’s kisser.” [Maclean’s]

Scheer’s so-con dilemma looks especially uncomfortable since Justin Trudeau seems to be having a moment as an international figure. In the wake of the G7 summit in France, a Mainstreet poll has Trudeau outstripping Scheer as the best leader to represent Canada abroad. Nicely timed to underscore that finding, respected former Harper cabinet minister Rona Ambrose told Canadian Press she disagrees with Scheer’s repeated charges that Trudeau “capitulated” to Donald Trump in the NAFTA renegotiations [CBC News]

What Scheer would undoubtedly much rather the late-summer news focused on is the transparently self-serving federal spending spree now being rolled out by Liberals in preparation for the fall election campaign. Among Parliament Hill reporters, David Akin of Global News keeps closest watch over this sort of ground-preparing largesse: he’s tallied 275 announcements between Aug. 16-23 alone worth $2.8 billion. Maclean’s turns a spotlight on 10 ridings to offer some telling details on what’s getting funded in different political contexts. [Maclean’s]

Of course, let’s not forget the NDP: Remember them? Don’t beat yourself up if they slipped your mind. Polls show Jagmeet Singh’s party struggling to stay in view. The latest projection, based on publicly available polls, from our Philippe Fournier contained grim news for Singh: “The NDP wins on average 21 seats, less than half its 44-seat total of 2015 under Tom Mulcair.” And yet there’s news out there that theoretically could play to NDP themes, if the NDP could somehow inject itself into the mix. For instance, Singh stresses the NDP’s determination to crack down on offshore tax havens, and CBC has a big story on the family of B.C. billionaire brothers Caleb and Tom Chan:

“The records show the Chan brothers were part of a group of more than 20 wealthy Canadians whose families had at least $5 million to invest in a sophisticated KPMG tax dodge first developed out of the accounting firm’s Vancouver office in the late 1990s. The KPMG offshore tax dodge helped wealthy clients set up shell companies on the Isle of Man, a tiny tax haven in the middle of the Irish Sea. It promised clients they could pay “no tax” on their investments and hide money from their ex-spouses.” [CBC News]

@repost Property Valuation for Divorce Settlement

Via Domestic Partner Agreement

source https://www.macleans.ca/politics/ottawa/tory-confusion-reopens-the-question-of-not-reopening-debates/

By The Wall of Law August 28, 2019 Off

Tory confusion reopens the question of ‘not reopening’ debates

Welcome to a sneak peek of the Maclean’s Politics Insider newsletter. Sign-up at the bottom of the page to get it delivered straight to your inbox.

Reopening the question what ‘not reopening’ means: Questions about Andrew Scheer’s stand on abortion have dogged him going back to his winning run for the Conservative leadership in 2017. He’s often repeated a clear pledge that if he was prime minister, his government would “not reopen this issue.” But would his let a Conservative MP propose an anti-abortion measure as a private member’s initiative? His Quebec lieutenant, MP Alain Rayes, said Tory MPs wouldn’t have that freedom—then had to recant. But Scheer himself hasn’t addressed the matter in plain language, leaving him open to Liberal attacks. Andrew MacDougall, who was on the staff of former prime minister Stephen Harper when he was keeping issues like abortion and same-sex marriage (on which Scheer has also come under unflattering scrutiny lately) from bursting into flame, wrote in his must-read Maclean’s column on what makes him uneasy:

“I’m listening to the Liberals because I look at Andrew Scheer and can’t quite take the measure of the man. Other people I speak with can’t either. Call us Red Tories. Call us whatever. We’re the people who believed it when Harper said the social conservative bits were permanently off the agenda but can’t quite buy the same lines coming out of Scheer’s kisser.” [Maclean’s]

Scheer’s so-con dilemma looks especially uncomfortable since Justin Trudeau seems to be having a moment as an international figure. In the wake of the G7 summit in France, a Mainstreet poll has Trudeau outstripping Scheer as the best leader to represent Canada abroad. Nicely timed to underscore that finding, respected former Harper cabinet minister Rona Ambrose told Canadian Press she disagrees with Scheer’s repeated charges that Trudeau “capitulated” to Donald Trump in the NAFTA renegotiations [CBC News]

What Scheer would undoubtedly much rather the late-summer news focused on is the transparently self-serving federal spending spree now being rolled out by Liberals in preparation for the fall election campaign. Among Parliament Hill reporters, David Akin of Global News keeps closest watch over this sort of ground-preparing largesse: he’s tallied 275 announcements between Aug. 16-23 alone worth $2.8 billion. Maclean’s turns a spotlight on 10 ridings to offer some telling details on what’s getting funded in different political contexts. [Maclean’s]

Of course, let’s not forget the NDP: Remember them? Don’t beat yourself up if they slipped your mind. Polls show Jagmeet Singh’s party struggling to stay in view. The latest projection, based on publicly available polls, from our Philippe Fournier contained grim news for Singh: “The NDP wins on average 21 seats, less than half its 44-seat total of 2015 under Tom Mulcair.” And yet there’s news out there that theoretically could play to NDP themes, if the NDP could somehow inject itself into the mix. For instance, Singh stresses the NDP’s determination to crack down on offshore tax havens, and CBC has a big story on the family of B.C. billionaire brothers Caleb and Tom Chan:

“The records show the Chan brothers were part of a group of more than 20 wealthy Canadians whose families had at least $5 million to invest in a sophisticated KPMG tax dodge first developed out of the accounting firm’s Vancouver office in the late 1990s. The KPMG offshore tax dodge helped wealthy clients set up shell companies on the Isle of Man, a tiny tax haven in the middle of the Irish Sea. It promised clients they could pay “no tax” on their investments and hide money from their ex-spouses.” [CBC News]

@repost Types of Child Custody

Via Divorce Lawyers Cost

source https://www.macleans.ca/politics/ottawa/tory-confusion-reopens-the-question-of-not-reopening-debates/

By The Wall of Law August 28, 2019 Off