Day: February 16, 2020

Hungary’s Orban warns about climate crisis, slow EU growth

BUDAPEST, Hungary — Hungary’s prime minister on Sunday declared the past decade as the most successful of Hungary’s past century, but also said the country was threatened by the climate crisis, continuing population decline and “sinister menaces gathering over the European economy.”

During his annual state of the nation speech made to an adoring crowd of supporters and political allies, Prime Minister Viktor Orban again lashed out at purported rivals like the leadership of the European Union, the International Monetary Fund and Hungarian-American billionaire philanthropist George Soros.

Orban, who returned to power in 2010 when Hungary was still under the effect of an international financial bailout, said his government rejected demands for more austerity and rid itself of the IMF-led loans to have a freer hand in its economic policies.

“If we’d followed their advice, then Hungary now would be lying in a hospital ward with IMF and Brussels debt tubes hanging from its every limb and the faucet of the debt would be in the hands of George Soros,” Orban said.

Orban said that while Hungary’s economic growth of 4.9% broadly outpaced the European average, Hungary was still closely tied to Europe’s economic performance as 85% of Hungarian exports are destined to other European countries.

“So their problem is our problem, too,” Orban said. “The only question is to what extent it will be our problem, too.”

“The European economy, especially that of the eurozone, has simply stopped,” Orban said, adding that economic growth in Europe in 2020 would be “microscopic, at most.”

Regarding demographic decline, Orban said that while the government’s economic incentives for married couples and large families had helped stem population decline, more measures were needed.

While the number of marriages was rising as divorces and abortions fell, “the bad news is that population decline did not stop,” Orban said. “The Hungarian continues to be an endangered species.”

Orban also announced policies to help the environment, including a 27% increase in forested areas, steps to ban single-use plastic packaging, and plans to offer incentives for the use of electric cars. He also said that all new buses used for urban public transportation licensed from 2022 would have to be electric.

Pablo Gorondi, The Associated Press

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source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2020/02/16/hungarys-orban-warns-about-climate-crisis-slow-eu-growth/

By The Wall of Law February 16, 2020 Off

AP News in Brief at 12:04 a.m. EST

New virus cases fall; Xi urged steps as early as Jan. 7

BEIJING (AP) — China reported Sunday a drop in new virus cases for the third straight day, as it became apparent that the country’s leadership was aware of the potential gravity of the situation well before the alarm was sounded.

In the early days of the epidemic, which has been one of the biggest political challenges of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s tenure, Xi played a muted role. But state media published Saturday evening a speech Xi delivered Feb. 3 in which he said he gave instructions on fighting the virus as early as Jan. 7.

The disclosure indicates top leaders knew about the outbreak’s potential severity weeks before such dangers were made known to the public. It was not until late January that officials said the virus can spread between humans and public alarm began to rise.

There are 2,009 new cases in mainland China, bringing its total number of confirmed cases to 68,500, according to the country’s National Health Commission.

The fatality rate remained stable with 142 new deaths, the commission said. The death toll in mainland China from COVID-19, a disease stemming from a new form of coronavirus, now stands at 1,665. In all, 9,419 people have recovered and been discharged from hospital.

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Cost of China’s anti-virus fight rises with workers idle

BEIJING (AP) — Real estate agent Du Xuekun’s sales usually jump after the Lunar New Year holiday. But this year, Du has been at home for a month with no income after vast swathes of China’s economy were shut down in a sweeping effort to contain a virus outbreak.

Du, who lives in Jiaozhuo, near the central city of Zhengzhou, is one of millions of people who are bearing the soaring cost of the most extreme anti-disease measures ever imposed. Some businesses are reopening, but Beijing has told the public to stay home if possible.

“People will buy food and clothes online but for sure won’t buy an apartment without seeing it,” said Du.

Industries from auto sales to travel to retailing effectively shut down after curbs were imposed starting Jan. 23 with the suspension of most access to Wuhan, an industrial metropolis of 11 million people at the centre of the outbreak.

Travel restrictions expanded to cities with more than 60 million people, while curbs on business spread nationwide. The Lunar New Year holiday was extended to keep factories and offices closed. Nationwide, thousands of restaurants and cinemas have been shut to prevent crowds from gathering.

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Turkey, Russia to discuss grave situation in Syria’s Idlib

MUNICH (AP) — A Turkish delegation will travel to Russia on Monday to discuss the situation in Syria’s Idlib province amid mounting fears of a humanitarian disaster there, Turkey’s foreign minister said.

Hundreds of thousands of civilians in Idlib province are scrambling to escape a widening, multi-front offensive by Syrian President Bashar Assad’s forces.

“What matters is today around 1 million people from Idlib have been moving towards our border,” Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said in a statement Saturday after a phone call with U.S. President Donald Trump in which they discussed Syria and other topics. “We are already hosting 3.5-4 million people. Unfortunately we are not in a position of accepting this another 1 million.”

Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said after meeting his German counterpart on the sidelines of the Munich Security Conference that 2 million people could head for Turkey’s border with Syria if no cease-fire is achieved.

He said a Turkish delegation was due to visit Moscow on Monday to talk discuss the situation in Idlib, much of which remains in rebel hands. The meeting follows previous visits by a Russian delegation to Ankara. Russia supports Assad, while Turkey backs the opposition.

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The Latest: Sanders says Bloomberg won’t inspire Democrats

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The Latest on the 2020 presidential campaign (all times local):

8:40 p.m.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders laced into billionaire former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg at a Democratic Party dinner in Las Vegas.

Sanders rattled off a list of Bloomberg heresies against the Democratic party — implementing “racist policies like stop and frisk” in New York, opposing the minimum wage or higher taxes on the wealthy during the Obama administration.

“The simple truth is that mayor Bloomberg with all his money will not create the kind of excitement and energy we need to have the voter turnout we must have to defeat Donald Trump,” Sanders said.

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Writer AE Hotchner, friend to Hemingway, Newman, dead at 102

A.E. Hotchner, a well-travelled author, playwright and gadabout whose street smarts and famous pals led to a loving, but litigated memoir of Ernest Hemingway, business adventures with Paul Newman and a book about his Depression-era childhood that became a Steven Soderbergh film, died Saturday at age 102.

He died at his home in Westport, Connecticut, according to his son, Timothy Hotchner, who did not immediately know the cause of death.

A. E. Hotchner, known to friends as “Ed” or “Hotch,” was an impish St. Louis native and ex-marbles champ who read, wrote and hustled himself out of poverty and went on to publish more than a dozen books, befriend countless celebrities and see his play, “The White House,” performed at the real White House for President Bill Clinton.

He was a natural fit for Elaine’s, the former Manhattan nightspot for the famous and the near-famous, and contributed the text for “Everyone Comes to Elaine’s,” an illustrated history. Hotchner’s other works included the novel “The Man Who Lived at the Ritz,” bestselling biographies of Doris Day and Sophia Loren, and a musical, “Let ‘Em Rot!” co-written with Cy Coleman.

In his 90s, he completed an upbeat book of essays on aging, “O.J. in the Morning, G&T at Night.” When he was 100, he wrote the detective novel “The Amazing Adventures of Aaron Broom.” At 101, he adapted Hemingway’s “The Old Man and the Sea” for the stage.

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‘Parasite’ shines light on South Korean basement dwellers

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Kim Da-hye, a 29-year-old South Korean, said that moving into a semi-basement apartment was her least-preferred option when she was looking for a new place to live.

But after a rigorous search and a close examination of her finances, she was forced to settle for a “banjiha,” the Korean word for a cramped basement flat.

South Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s Oscar-winning film “Parasite” has brought banjiha dwellers like Kim to worldwide attention, thanks to its depiction of two families — one living in a semi-basement apartment and the other in an airy mansion — and the differences in their social status.

In 2015, around 1.9% of South Koreans lived in semi-basement apartments, according to data from Statistics Korea. It’s an affordable choice for urban dwellers in Seoul, one of the most expensive cities in Asia.

The apartments, which are often cramped and sometimes squalid, generally cost between $210 and $500 a month with a hefty deposit.

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Mississippi braces for flooding amid cresting river

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves declared a state of emergency Saturday amid predictions that a river running in the area around the state capital of Jackson could burst its banks and spark widespread flooding.

Forecasters believe the Pearl River will crest at 38 feet (11.6 metres) Sunday evening to levels not seen in decades, following days of torrential rains across the Southeast. Reeves said the state should prepare for “the third worst flood” in its history.

“This is a historic, unprecedented flood,” Reeves said via Twitter.

Parts of Jackson and suburban Ridgeland were under evacuation orders, and some people had already filled trucks with furniture and other belongings to get out. Reeves said more than 2,400 homes and other structures in and near Jackson could either be inundated or isolated by the rising waters. That includes 1,925 structures in Hinds County, 461 in Rankin County and 31 in Madison County.

“I cannot stress to you how important the next 24 to 48 hours is for the people who are going to be affected,” Reeves said. He signed an emergency declaration to speed up spending for flood response and recovery. More than 96,000 sandbags had already been distributed by Saturday. The National Guard, the Highway Patrol and other high-water rescue teams were on standby, Reeves said.

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US agency to pay for 11,000 miles of fuel breaks in 6 states

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The Bureau of Land Management has announced plans to fund 11,000 miles (17,703 kilometres) of strategic fuel breaks in Idaho, Oregon, Washington, California, Nevada and Utah in an effort to help control wildfires.

The fuel breaks are intended to prop up fire mitigation efforts and help protect firefighters, communities and natural resources, The Oregonian reported Saturday.

According to the BLM, wildfires are becoming bigger and more frequent across the Great Basin states. Between 2009 and 2018, more than 13.5 million acres of BLM land burned in the project area.

“Recovering from the devastating effects of wildfires can take decades in the rugged, high-desert climate of the Great Basin. These tools will help firefighters contain fires when they break out,” said acting Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management Casey Hammond in a news release. “That’s why creating fuel breaks is incredibly important to the entire basin, the people who live in these communities, and our wildland firefighters.”

Fuel breaks are intended to break up fire fuels by creating breaks in vegetation that slow a blaze’s progress. By implementing them strategically, they help firefighters control the spread of fire, and can protect homes and resources.

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14-year-old charged with Barnard College student death

NEW YORK (AP) — A 14-year-old has been arrested in the fatal stabbing of a Barnard College student in a park during a robbery in December, a crime that rattled New York City residents, authorities said Saturday.

Rashaun Weaver has been indicted by a grand jury and was taken into custody Friday night without incident, New York City Police Commissioner Dermot Shea said at a news conference.

Weaver, charged with second-degree murder and robbery, is the second teenager to be charged in the attack on 18-year-old Tessa Majors in a Manhattan park.

“We are confident that we have the person in custody who stabbed her,” Shea said. “And that person will face justice in a court of law.”

The Associated Press is naming the juvenile defendant because of the seriousness of the crime and because he has been charged as an adult. Weaver’s attorney, Elsie Chandler, did not immediately return a call to Neighbor Defender Service of Harlem seeking comment.

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Warren Buffett’s son helps Colombia kick cocaine curse

TIBU, Colombia (AP) — With Colombian military snipers in position, Howard Buffett descends from a helicopter and trudges through the wet grass in steel-toe boots chewed through by his dog’s teeth.

Waiting under a tin-roofed shack is a small group of coca farmers. They’ve never heard of multi-billionaire investor Warren Buffett, but after decades of neglect by their own government they’re grateful for the outstretched hand of his eldest son, who they refer to simply as “the gringo.”

“There’s a saying here: The less you know, the better,” said Rubén Morantes, his leathery skin and calloused hands a testament to a lifetime of tillage in one of Colombia’s most-dangerous territories, where outsiders are traditionally mistrusted.

For nearly two decades Buffett has crisscrossed the world giving away part of his father’s fortune to promote food security, conflict mitigation and public safety. But his latest gamble is one of the most daunting yet: helping Colombia kick its cocaine curse.

He is focusing on Tibu, heart of the remote, notoriously lawless Catatumbo region bordering Venezuela where Buffett accompanied President Iván Duque.

The Associated Press

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Trial begins for Mississippi man charged in killing of 8

MAGNOLIA, Miss. — Opening arguments began Saturday in the death penalty trial of a man accused of killing eight people in Mississippi in May 2017.

The killings began after Willie Cory Godbolt entered his in-laws’ home in Bogue Chitto and got into an argument with his estranged wife and her family over the couple’s two children, witness Vincent Mitchell testified in a Pike County courtroom, according to The Daily Leader. Mitchell said Godbolt fatally shot a responding deputy and then killed Godbolt’s mother-in-law and two other people.

Godbolt then went to two other homes in south Mississippi’s Lincoln County, killing two of his teenage cousins and a husband and wife, investigators said.

After being captured, Godbolt, now 37, said “I’m sorry” while a reporter was recording him.

Godbolt’s attorney Katherine Poor told the jurors that her client was trying to protect his family and believed his daughter had been inappropriately touched by a family member at the in-laws’ home.

“Cory just snapped,” Poor said. “Cory couldn’t see the breakup of his family. He couldn’t fail to protect his children. In that moment in a haze of fear at the breakup of his family, Cory pulled his gun out.”

Godbolt has pleaded not guilty to four counts of capital murder, four counts of murder, one count of attempted murder, two counts of kidnapping and one count of armed robbery. He has remained in custody since his arrest on May 28, 2017, hours after the shootings.

Because of pretrial publicity in south Mississippi, jury selection was done in north Mississippi’s DeSoto County, 285 miles (459 kilometres) north of Lincoln County. The 12 jurors and three alternates were selected Friday. They are hearing the case in Magnolia, which is near Lincoln County.

The trial was scheduled to continue on Sunday.

The Associated Press

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source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2020/02/15/trial-begins-for-mississippi-man-charged-in-killing-of-8/

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7 children hurt, including an 8-year-old, in separate Chicago shootings

Four separate shootings on Chicago’s West and South sides wounded at least seven children, including three cases that appear accidental, police said Saturday.

Three of the minors were wounded in a shooting at an apartment complex Friday night on the city’s South Side. Police said the shooting started during a “gathering” inside an apartment unit and spilled into the hall, according to a release issued early Saturday.

Three adults also were wounded in the shooting at the Parkway Gardens housing complex.

Police said a 14-year-old girl, 18-year-old man and 23-year-old woman were listed in critical condition. The girl suffered wounds to her back, shoulder, lower backside and leg, while the woman suffered wounds to her back, shoulder, head and stomach. The man suffered multiple wounds to his leg.

A 20-year-old man who suffered wounds to his face, chest and leg was listed in serious condition.

Another 14-year-old girl, who suffered a gunshot wound to her leg, and a 15-year-old girl with gunshot wounds to her leg and foot were in good condition, police said.

The release said the circumstances leading to the shooting weren’t immediately known. Police said the 23-year-old woman was armed with a handgun, but didn’t say whether she fired the weapon.

Police described the other shootings that injured minors as accidental, based on their initial investigations.

The first of those reports came around 8 p.m. on Friday night. Police said a seven-year-old girl was holding a gun when it went off, hitting an 11-year-old boy in the neck. He was taken to a hospital in serious condition.

A few hours later, a young boy was playing with a gun when it fired and shot an eight-year-old boy in the shoulder and grazed a 12-year-old girl’s arm inside a home on the South Side. They were both taken in fair condition to a hospital.

Police said it wasn’t clear who the gun belonged to.

On Saturday afternoon, a 14-year-old girl was hit in the cheek when a 15-year-old boy fired a gun at a home on the city’s West Side.

The girl was taken to a hospital in fair condition and the boy was in police custody.

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source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2020/02/15/7-children-hurt-including-an-8-year-old-in-separate-chicago-shootings/

By The Wall of Law February 16, 2020 Off