Day: March 17, 2020

US sued to stop deportation of 3 children to El Salvador

HOUSTON — After being denied U.S. asylum in Texas and returned to a squalid camp in Mexico, a mother from El Salvador chose to send her three children back across the border alone. Now, those children face deportation, even though their father lives in Maryland and is eager to take them in, according to attorneys.

Lawyers for the children sued the U.S. government Tuesday demanding that the children be released from a government facility and allowed to seek asylum.

Their mother remains in Matamoros, Mexico, where an estimated 2,000 people live in a squalid tent camp, waiting for their court hearings a short distance away in Brownsville, Texas.

Many parents at the camp have made the same choice. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 498 children in its custody have said their family is in Mexico.

In the lawsuit filed in federal court in Washington, D.C., the CAIR Coalition and Justice Action Council argue that the children deserve a new court hearing because they are now considered “unaccompanied” children under government rules.

The Associated Press is withholding the names of the mother and her children because they fear being targeted by MS-13 if forced to return to El Salvador.

According to the lawsuit, the mother and father were active in their local church in El Salvador and frequently evangelized to others. They believe their ministry drew the attention of MS-13, the violent transnational gang. Gang members attacked the father and eventually threatened his life, leading the family to flee.

They lived in Mexico for two years, then moved back to El Salvador, going from town to town, the lawsuit says. But they concluded last year that they would have to try to enter the U.S.

The father and his second eldest daughter went first, arriving in the U.S. in June 2019 and settling in Maryland after they were released by border agents.

The mother and three of their children — daughters now aged 16 and 14, and a 9-year-old son — left later and arrived at the U.S.-Mexico border in September. By then, the U.S. had implemented its “Remain in Mexico” program in South Texas, under which more than 50,000 people have been sent back across the border with court dates sometimes months away.

The mother and her three children were sent to Matamoros under the program.

In January, a judge in Brownsville denied their asylum claim and the family returned to the camp.

At the camp, someone grabbed the 16-year-old daughter and tried to assault her. Another person beat the 9-year-old boy and took money he had to buy food. They had seen kidnappings and extortion attempts, and once observed a corpse floating in the nearby Rio Grande.

So the mother sent her three children across the border alone in January.

The Department of Health and Human Services has declined to release the three children, so their father goes to a facility in Crofton, Maryland, to see them.

He says he is certain that if they are deported, they would be killed.

“My only purpose was to save my family,” he said.

Even if the children win their case in U.S. courts, the mother may have no way of entering the country herself. According to her lawyers, she has missed a deadline to file an appeal.

The mom said she would be happy regardless.

“A mother wants the best for her children,” she said. “Nothing can compare to a mother’s love.”

Nomaan Merchant, The Associated Press

@repost Divorce and Children

Via Divorce Arbitration

source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2020/03/17/us-sued-to-stop-deportation-of-3-children-to-el-salvador/

By The Wall of Law March 17, 2020 Off

US sued to stop deportation of 3 children to El Salvador

HOUSTON — After being denied U.S. asylum in Texas and returned to a squalid camp in Mexico, a mother from El Salvador chose to send her three children back across the border alone. Now, those children face deportation, even though their father lives in Maryland and is eager to take them in, according to attorneys.

Lawyers for the children sued the U.S. government Tuesday demanding that the children be released from a government facility and allowed to seek asylum.

Their mother remains in Matamoros, Mexico, where an estimated 2,000 people live in a squalid tent camp, waiting for their court hearings a short distance away in Brownsville, Texas.

Many parents at the camp have made the same choice. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 498 children in its custody have said their family is in Mexico.

In the lawsuit filed in federal court in Washington, D.C., the CAIR Coalition and Justice Action Council argue that the children deserve a new court hearing because they are now considered “unaccompanied” children under government rules.

The Associated Press is withholding the names of the mother and her children because they fear being targeted by MS-13 if forced to return to El Salvador.

According to the lawsuit, the mother and father were active in their local church in El Salvador and frequently evangelized to others. They believe their ministry drew the attention of MS-13, the violent transnational gang. Gang members attacked the father and eventually threatened his life, leading the family to flee.

They lived in Mexico for two years, then moved back to El Salvador, going from town to town, the lawsuit says. But they concluded last year that they would have to try to enter the U.S.

The father and his second eldest daughter went first, arriving in the U.S. in June 2019 and settling in Maryland after they were released by border agents.

The mother and three of their children — daughters now aged 16 and 14, and a 9-year-old son — left later and arrived at the U.S.-Mexico border in September. By then, the U.S. had implemented its “Remain in Mexico” program in South Texas, under which more than 50,000 people have been sent back across the border with court dates sometimes months away.

The mother and her three children were sent to Matamoros under the program.

In January, a judge in Brownsville denied their asylum claim and the family returned to the camp.

At the camp, someone grabbed the 16-year-old daughter and tried to assault her. Another person beat the 9-year-old boy and took money he had to buy food. They had seen kidnappings and extortion attempts, and once observed a corpse floating in the nearby Rio Grande.

So the mother sent her three children across the border alone in January.

The Department of Health and Human Services has declined to release the three children, so their father goes to a facility in Crofton, Maryland, to see them.

He says he is certain that if they are deported, they would be killed.

“My only purpose was to save my family,” he said.

Even if the children win their case in U.S. courts, the mother may have no way of entering the country herself. According to her lawyers, she has missed a deadline to file an appeal.

The mom said she would be happy regardless.

“A mother wants the best for her children,” she said. “Nothing can compare to a mother’s love.”

Nomaan Merchant, The Associated Press

@repost Divorce in Canada Spousal Support

Via Legal Separation Lawyer

source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2020/03/17/us-sued-to-stop-deportation-of-3-children-to-el-salvador/

By The Wall of Law March 17, 2020 Off

Ontario freezes evictions, temporarily halts scheduled orders due to COVID-19

The Ontario government has confirmed that it will temporarily not issue any new eviction orders due to COVID-19 and will halt the enforcement of evictions scheduled for this week.

The news comes after lawyers, housing advocates and tenants pressured the government to put a moratorium on evictions similar to some cities in the United States.

“No new eviction orders will be issued until further notice,” a spokesperson Ministry of the Attorney General wrote in an email to CTV News Toronto.

“In addition, sheriff’s offices have been asked to postpone any scheduled enforcement of eviction orders currently set for this week.”

Cole Webber, a legal clinic worker, spoke to CTV News Toronto in an interview before the decision was announced Monday evening and said that a number of his clients were facing eviction, including families and low-income residents.

“We are already in a housing crisis in the city … there are not many available places and rents is very high, [and] so for people, especially low-income people, finding a new place can often be impossible,” he told CTV News Toronto Monday morning.

“Clients always express worry about being evicted from their home, the eviction is always devastating and traumatic, but only more so in the context of a public health crisis.”

He said as health officials stress the importance of staying home and away from crowded areas, the option to do so would be impossible for people facing eviction in the Greater Toronto Area.

In order for a tenant to be evicted from a home in Ontario, the landlord must apply to the Landlord and Tenant Board for an eviction order. If a hearing is scheduled, the board can then decide to issue an eviction order.

The order is enforced through a municipal sheriff’s office, which means that the sheriff could come unannounced and change the locks of a family or person’s home.

The government has halted all enforcement of pending evictions for this week, but has not yet said what will happen after.

“The Government of Ontario’s top priority is the health and well-being of Ontarians and we are actively looking at all tools and options to protect families and individuals as the public health situation evolves,” spokesperson Jenessa Crognali said.

@repost Family Court Lawyers

Via Separation Property Settlement

source https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/ontario-freezes-evictions-temporarily-halts-scheduled-orders-due-to-covid-19-1.4856404

By The Wall of Law March 17, 2020 Off

Former priest in northern Virginia charged with sexual abuse

FALLS CHURCH, Va. — A former Catholic priest in northern Virginia has been charged with sexually abusing a teenager in a case that dates back nearly 35 years, and a city councilman for the District of Columbia came forward to say he was the victim.

Scott Asalone, 63, of Asbury Park, New Jersey, was charged in Loudoun County with carnal knowledge of a minor, Attorney General Mark Herring’s office said Monday.

Asalone was arrested Saturday in New Jersey and will be transferred to Virginia, Herring’s office said.

After Asalone’s arrest was announced, D.C. Councilman David Grosso issued a statement saying, “The minor he assaulted was me.”

Though the Associated Press doesn’t generally identify alleged victims of sexual assault, Grosso came forward publicly.

“This occurred during a very difficult time of my life. Since then, I have been working through the negative impact of this abuse on my life. With the loving support of my wife Serra and my family, I am proud of the progress I have made,” Grosso wrote.

Asalone was on a list released last year of more than a dozen priests described by the Arlington Diocese as credibly accused of abuse.

In 1985, at the time of the alleged abuse, Asalone was assigned to St. Francis de Sales Catholic Church in Purcellville.

The indictment alleges that Asalone engaged in sexual relations “without the use of force” with a minor aged 13 or 14 at some point between April and September of 1985.

The diocese said he has been removed from public ministry since 1993 and was dismissed from his religious order, the Capuchin Friars, in 2007.

He was ordained in 1983. A diocese spokeswoman said the Purcellville parish is the only place Asalone served during his time in the diocese from 1984 through 1993, when he was removed after an allegation of sexual abuse.

On a LinkedIn page in his name matching his experience and biography, Asalone describes himself as a speaker, author and “expert on achievement and success.” The page also lists Asalone as co-founder of “The Greatness Project,” which is described as “a quest to find out, first-hand, how people strive for and achieve greatness.”

Asalone’s lawyer, Barry Coburn, said his client “very much looks forward to his day in court and seeking vindication in front of a jury.”

In a statement, Herring said Asalone’s indictment is the first to come from his ongoing investigation, along with Virginia State Police, into clergy sexual abuse. He urged victims to come forward.

“I know that stepping forward to share your experience can be difficult or scary but I want you to know that, even if it happened years ago, we will still take it seriously and make sure you get the help and support you need,” he said.

Grosso said Virginia authorities reached out to him several times in the past year and asked him to testify to a grand jury, which he did.

“This new investigation into a crime the Diocese attempted to bury for decades has ripped open old wounds, stirred dark memories and caused fresh trauma as I have been forced vividly to relive the tragic events of my childhood,” Gross wrote.

He continued, “I have again received therapy and made difficult decisions to advance my recovery. My conclusion not to seek another term as a Councilmember was heavily influenced by this new case.”

Matthew Barakat, The Associated Press

@repost Custody Lawyer

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source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2020/03/16/former-priest-in-northern-virginia-charged-with-sexual-abuse/

By The Wall of Law March 17, 2020 Off