012018-Manson_Follower_parole

012018-Manson_Follower_parole

LOS ANGELES — A California panel on Wednesday recommended that Charles Manson follower Leslie Van Houten be paroled after serving more than four decades in prison.

After a hearing at the women’s prison in Chino, California, commissioners of the Board of Parole Hearings found for the third time that the 69-year-old Van Houten was suitable for release.

If her case withstands a 150-day review process, it will rest in the hands of California’s new Gov. Gavin Newsom. Van Houten was recommended for parole twice previously, but then-Gov. Jerry Brown blocked her release.

This March 29, 1971, file photo shows Leslie Van Houten in a Los Angeles lockup.

Van Houten was among the followers in Manson’s murderous cult who stabbed to death wealthy grocer Leno LaBianca and his wife, Rosemary, in 1969. Van Houten was 19 during the killings, which came a day after other Manson followers killed pregnant actress Sharon Tate and four others in Los Angeles.

Tate’s sister attended Wednesday’s proceedings and said afterward that she vehemently disagrees with the parole recommendation.

“I just have to hope and pray that the governor comes to the right decision” and keeps Van Houten behind bars, Debra Tate said. Newsom’s office didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

Van Houten’s lawyer, Rich Pfeiffer, said he was pleased with how the commissioners focused on making sure that she took “full responsibility” for her role in the killings.

“She chose to go with Manson. She chose to listen to him. And she acknowledges that,” Pfeiffer said. He predicted that it “will be much more difficult” for Newsom to block parole than it was for Brown.

Charles Manson is escorted to his arraignment on conspiracy-murder charges in connection with the Sharon Tate murder case in 1969.

In his decision last year, Brown acknowledged Van Houten’s youth at the time of the crime, her more than four decades of good behaviour as a prisoner and her abuse at the hands of Manson. But he said she still laid too much blame on Manson for the murders.

At her last hearing, Van Houten described a troubled childhood. She said she was devastated when her parents divorced when she was 14. Soon after, she said, she began hanging out with her school’s outcast crowd and using drugs. When she was 17, she and her boyfriend ran away to San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury District during the city’s Summer of Love.

She was travelling up and down the California coast when acquaintances led her to Manson. He was holed up at an abandoned movie ranch on the outskirts of Los Angeles where he had recruited what he called a “family” to survive what he insisted would be a race war he would launch by committing a series of random, horrifying murders.

Van Houten said she joined several other members of the group in killing the LaBiancas, carving up Leno LaBianca’s body and smearing the couple’s blood on the walls.

No one who took part in the Tate-LaBianca murders has been released from prison.

Manson died in 2017 of natural causes at a California hospital while serving a life sentence.

Earlier this month, a California parole panel recommended for the first time that Manson follower Robert Beausoleil be freed. Beausoleil was convicted of killing musician Gary Hinman.

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source https://canoe.com/news/crime/manson-follower-leslie-van-houten-again-seeks-parole

By The Wall of Law January 31, 2019 Off

012018-Manson_Follower_parole

012018-Manson_Follower_parole

LOS ANGELES — A California panel on Wednesday recommended that Charles Manson follower Leslie Van Houten be paroled after serving more than four decades in prison.

After a hearing at the women’s prison in Chino, California, commissioners of the Board of Parole Hearings found for the third time that the 69-year-old Van Houten was suitable for release.

If her case withstands a 150-day review process, it will rest in the hands of California’s new Gov. Gavin Newsom. Van Houten was recommended for parole twice previously, but then-Gov. Jerry Brown blocked her release.

This March 29, 1971, file photo shows Leslie Van Houten in a Los Angeles lockup.

Van Houten was among the followers in Manson’s murderous cult who stabbed to death wealthy grocer Leno LaBianca and his wife, Rosemary, in 1969. Van Houten was 19 during the killings, which came a day after other Manson followers killed pregnant actress Sharon Tate and four others in Los Angeles.

Tate’s sister attended Wednesday’s proceedings and said afterward that she vehemently disagrees with the parole recommendation.

“I just have to hope and pray that the governor comes to the right decision” and keeps Van Houten behind bars, Debra Tate said. Newsom’s office didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

Van Houten’s lawyer, Rich Pfeiffer, said he was pleased with how the commissioners focused on making sure that she took “full responsibility” for her role in the killings.

“She chose to go with Manson. She chose to listen to him. And she acknowledges that,” Pfeiffer said. He predicted that it “will be much more difficult” for Newsom to block parole than it was for Brown.

Charles Manson is escorted to his arraignment on conspiracy-murder charges in connection with the Sharon Tate murder case in 1969.

In his decision last year, Brown acknowledged Van Houten’s youth at the time of the crime, her more than four decades of good behaviour as a prisoner and her abuse at the hands of Manson. But he said she still laid too much blame on Manson for the murders.

At her last hearing, Van Houten described a troubled childhood. She said she was devastated when her parents divorced when she was 14. Soon after, she said, she began hanging out with her school’s outcast crowd and using drugs. When she was 17, she and her boyfriend ran away to San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury District during the city’s Summer of Love.

She was travelling up and down the California coast when acquaintances led her to Manson. He was holed up at an abandoned movie ranch on the outskirts of Los Angeles where he had recruited what he called a “family” to survive what he insisted would be a race war he would launch by committing a series of random, horrifying murders.

Van Houten said she joined several other members of the group in killing the LaBiancas, carving up Leno LaBianca’s body and smearing the couple’s blood on the walls.

No one who took part in the Tate-LaBianca murders has been released from prison.

Manson died in 2017 of natural causes at a California hospital while serving a life sentence.

Earlier this month, a California parole panel recommended for the first time that Manson follower Robert Beausoleil be freed. Beausoleil was convicted of killing musician Gary Hinman.

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source https://canoe.com/news/crime/manson-follower-leslie-van-houten-again-seeks-parole

By The Wall of Law January 31, 2019 Off

Family Law Firm in Vaughan Announces Wills and Estates Services

Family Law Firm in Vaughan Announces Wills and Estates Services

Family Law Firm in Vaughan Announces Wills and Estates Services

Mazzeo Law, a family law firm in Vaughan has announced that it is accepting cases requiring will and estates services.

The Ontario-based firm specialises in family, real estate and will or estate laws. According to an estate planning lawyer for the firm, will and estate planning is not just for wealthy people. “If you have worked hard to accumulate what you have right now or establish that business, you deserve the right to protect it,” he said. “It’s not easy to think about these things but it’s a fact of life. People pass away. Relationships end. In all these situations, it is always best to be prepared, especially for the sake of our loved ones.”

The same estate planning lawyer in Vaughan noted that an experienced family lawyer can ensure that a will adequately protects a person’s assets and that it is properly documented, which is crucial for the will to have legal grounding.

He added, “Estate planning should be part of long-term financial planning. Many people do not realise that transferring assets, even to your own family, will incur costs. As veteran lawyers, part of what we do is offer tax and cost mitigation strategies to ensure that our clients’ loved ones are not burdened by these issues when the time comes that they have to deal with it.”

The Ontario Ministry of the Attorney General website defines a will as a written document that specifies a person’s wishes regarding the care and distribution of his or her estate after death, which is when it will take effect. Estate refers to the property that a person owns or has a legal interest in. This includes both assets and liabilities.  

When it comes to distribution of estate, the process depends on whether the recently deceased left a valid will. If there is a will, the estate is distributed as instructed, after the funeral and burial expenses are paid, as well as any debts. However, a will can be challenged and in certain situations, the law takes precedence over the wishes of the person who died.

For instance, if the person who died has a surviving spouse or dependent, they will be prioritised over anyone else named in the will. A will may also become invalid if the person who created it got married or divorced after they wrote the will. Joint properties and bank accounts, as well as insurance policies, can also complicate the execution of a will.

In the event that there is no valid will, the distribution of the deceased person’s estate is dictated by Ontario’s Succession Law Reform Act. As an overview, according to the Act, the first $200,000 is given to the deceased person’s spouse, unless a financial dependent makes a claim. The surviving spouse can also opt to claim half of the net family property. Anything over $200,000 is divided among the spouse and descendants which includes children and grandchildren.

If there is no spouse, the children and grandchildren are next in the line of succession. If there are no children or grandchildren, surviving parents, brothers and sisters, nieces and nephews follow in that order. The rules become more complex when a deceased person is survived only by what the law considers as distant relatives.

The attorney from the firm furthered, “Creating a will is a crucial process that can affect the future of a family, a business or a legacy. We encourage people to take the first step. Talk to an estate planning lawyer so we can help secure that future for your loved ones.”

To find out more about wills and estate planning specifically in Ontario, or to book a consultation, visit the firm’s website.

Contact us at any time:

Mazzeo Law Barristers & Solicitors

Mazzeo Law Barristers & Solicitors

3300 Hwy 7 Suite 904
Vaughan, Ontario L4K 4M3

Website:
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (905) 851-5909
Fax: (905) 851-3514

 

source https://www.mazzeolaw.ca/family-law-news/family-law-firm-in-vaughan-announces-wills-and-estates-services/

By The Wall of Law January 30, 2019 Off

Brexit envoy insists EU united as UK’s May seeks concessions

BRUSSELS — The European Union’s Brexit negotiator says the EU stands united in defence of its divorce deal with Britain, after Prime Minister Theresa won a parliamentary mandate to reopen the agreement.

Michel Barnier said Wednesday that “the EU institutions remain united, and we stand by the agreement that we have negotiated with the U.K., never against the U.K.”

Barnier made his brief remarks after he met top European Parliament officials to discuss the Brexit votes in the British Parliament late Tuesday.

Britain is set to leave the EU in less than two months, but the main sticking point in London to sealing a Brexit agreement is the so-called “backstop.”

It’s aimed at ensuring that no time-consuming customs checks happen on the Irish border after Britain leaves, until a better arrangement is found.

The Associated Press

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source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/01/30/brexit-envoy-insists-eu-united-as-uks-may-seeks-concessions/

By The Wall of Law January 30, 2019 Off

Quebec mother accused of killing daughters says they were her only source of joy

LAVAL, Que. — A Quebec woman on trial for murder in the deaths of her two young daughters testified Tuesday that her children were the sole source of joy in her life.

Adele Sorella took the stand in her defence, recounting to the jury how her life took a turn following surgery to remove a brain tumour, which left her with physical disabilities and began her on a path to mental illness.

Her testimony was difficult as she is deaf in one ear and was left with partial facial paralysis after the brain surgery. Her statements were interspersed with tears.

She said she was pregnant with her second daughter, Sabrina, when vomiting landed her in a hospital emergency room. The doctors detected a loss of hearing, she said, but fearful for the health of her unborn child, she refused the cortisone prescribed.

Doctors recommended brain surgery, but she said she preferred to wait until her child was born. After the operation, one eye would not close completely, her mouth was paralyzed and she would constantly lose her balance. She could not smile, and she could not take her daughters in her arms, she said.

“I had become a burden,” she told the jury, adding that it was the beginning of her mental illness.

In 2006, police arrived at her home to arrest her husband, Giuseppe De Vito as part of a major anti-Mafia operation dubbed Project Colisee. Sorella told the court this was the first inkling she had that her husband was involved with organized crime.

“I told them, ‘You’ve got the wrong person,’ ” she said. But it turned out her husband was not just out of town for a few days; he was a fugitive on the run.

It was the last straw, and her mental state deteriorated, she said. Between 2006 and 2008, she said she tried to take her own life three times. She said she felt guilty that she was unable to give her daughters a happy life, but she never tried to harm them.

Sorella, 52, has pleaded not guilty to charges of first-degree murder in the deaths of Amanda De Vito, 9, and Sabrina De Vito, 8. The girls were found dead in the family playroom on March 31, 2009, dressed in their school uniforms.

The cause of death was never established, but the girls were in good health, and Crown prosecutor Nektarios Tzortzinas has told the court the sisters could not have died from natural causes. He stated at the beginning of the trial that only Sorella had the opportunity to kill the girls.

Sorella’s testimony is scheduled to resume Wednesday.

 

Stephanie Marin, The Canadian Press

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source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/01/29/quebec-mother-accused-of-killing-daughters-says-they-were-her-only-source-of-joy/

By The Wall of Law January 30, 2019 Off