Golden Globes 2020 Nominations: Netflix Scores Four Best Picture Nominees

Netflix made awards show history by dominating the 2020 Golden Globes nominations, scoring its first-ever Best Picture nods for four of its films.

But Canadians were largely shut out of this year’s awards, with no nominations for last year’s Best Actress in a Drama series, Sandra Oh, or homegrown success story, “Schitt’s Creek.”

The only CanCon on the nominees list came from Aylmer, Que.’s Deam DeBlois, who wrote and directed Best Animated Picture nominee “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World,” which features the voice of Montreal actor Jay Baruchel. And another Montrealer, Jean-Marc Vallée, is executive producer of “Big Little Lies,” nominated for Best Drama Series. 

This year was light on surprises, with Noah Baumbach’s devastating portrait of divorce “Marriage Story” leading the pack with six nominations across the acting, writing and directing categories. Martin Scorsese’s gangster epic, “The Irishman,” which arrived on Netflix earlier this month after a limited theatrical release, trailed not too far behind with five nominations, though Robert De Niro was snubbed in the Best Actor race. 

The nominees for achievements in film and television ahead of the 77th annual awards ceremony were unveiled by actors Tim Allen, Dakota Fanning, and Susan Kelechi Watson at a news conference at the Beverly Hilton in Los Angeles, which will host the entertainment industry’s biggest party early next year. 

Dylan Brosnan, Dakota Fanning, Tim Allen, Susan Kelechi Watson and Paris Brosnan at the Golden Globe Awards nomination announcement on Monday morning.

The idiosyncratic voting body comprised of 90-plus journalists, known as the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, determine who’s in the running for Globes glory and have a history of surprising Hollywood with refreshingly divergent nominations. Last year’s winners, however, were an uncharacteristically accurate portent for Oscars gold, with Rami Malek of “Bohemian Rhapsody” and the polarizing “Green Book” taking the top prizes

This year, Netflix’s Eddie Murphy-fronted comedy “Dolemite Is My Name” was also represented strongly in nominations for the comedy categories, while the absorbing religious drama “The Two Popes” scored four nods for the streaming service.

But don’t count out Quentin Tarantino’s sweeping “Once Upon A Time In Hollywood” about Hollywood’s golden age, which nabbed five nominations, or Todd Phillips’ record-breaking “Joker,” which won four nominations and could get the last laugh this awards season. 

Olivia Colman in

In the television arena, Netflix’s royal drama “The Crown” and “Unbelievable,” as well as HBO’s “Chernobyl” are front-runners heading into the ceremony, while Apple TV Plus’ “The Morning Show” made a surprisingly plentiful showing with nominations for leads Jennifer Aniston and Reese Witherspoon. After a divisive final season, HBO’s “Game of Thrones” won’t make a victory lap at the Golden Globes ceremony, scoring only single nod for actor Kit Harington.

Despite immense critical acclaim and securing Emmys earlier this year, Ava DuVernay’s searing Netflix series, “When They See Us,” was completely ignored by the Globes.

The 2020 Golden Globes also will honour Tom Hanks with the Cecil B. DeMille Award for “outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment.” In addition, Hanks’ turn as Mister Rogers in “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood” may figure in the nominations.

Ellen DeGeneres is set to receive the Carol Burnett Award, which pays tribute to a performer who has made outstanding contributions to television both on and off screen. 

The 77th Annual Golden Globe Awards will be presented Sunday, Jan. 5, in Los Angeles with Ricky Gervais returning as host for the fifth time.

Check out the full list of nominations below. 

Best Motion Picture – Drama 

“1917”

“The Irishman”

“Joker”

“Marriage Story”

“The Two Popes” 

 

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy 

“Dolemite is my Name”

“Jojo Rabbit”

“Knives Out”

“Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”

“Rocketman”

 

Best Director 

Bong Joon Ho, “Parasite”

Sam Mendes, “1917”

Quentin Tarantino, “Once Upon A Time In Hollywood”

Martin Scorsese, “The Irishman”

Todd Phillips, “Joker”

 

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama

Cynthio Erivo, “Harriet”

Scarlett Johansson, “Marriage Story”

Saoirse Ronan, “Little Women”

Charlize Theron, “Bombshell”

Renee Zellweger, “Judy”

 

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama

Christian Bale, “Ford v Ferrari”

Antonio Banderas, “Pain & Glory”

Adam Driver, “Marriage Story”

Joaquin Phoenix, “Joker”

Jonathan Pryce, “The Two Popes”

 

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

Awkwafina, “The Farewell”

Ana de Armas, “Knives Out”

Beanie Feldstein, “Booksmart”

Emma Thompson, “Late Night”

Cate Blanchett, “Where’d You Go Bernadette”

 

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

Daniel Craig, “Knives Out”

Roman Griffin Davis, “Jojo Rabbit”

Leonardo DiCaprio, “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”

Taron Egerton, “Rocketman”

Eddie Murphy, “Dolemite Is My Name”

 

Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture

Annette Benning, “The Report”

Margot Robbie, “Bombshell”

Jennifer Lopez, “Hustlers”

Kathy Bates, “Richard Jewell”

Laura Dern, “Marriage Story”

 

Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture

Tom Hanks, “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”

Al Pacino, “The Irishman”

Joe Pesci, “The Irishman”

Brad Pitt, “Once Upon A Time In Hollywood”

Anthony Hopkins, “The Two Popes”

 

Best Foreign Language Film 

“The Farewell”

“Les Misérables”

“Pain and Glory”

“Parasite”

“Portrait of a Lady on Fire”

 

Best Motion Picture – Animated

“Frozen II” 

“How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World”

“Missing Link” 

“Toy Story 4” 

“Lion King”

 

Best Screenplay

“Marriage Story”

“Parasite”

“The Two Popes”

“Once Upon A Time In Hollywood”

“The Irishman”

 

Best Original Song – Motion Picture

“Beautiful Ghosts” (“Cats”)

“(I’m Gonna) Love Me Again” (“Rocketman”)

“Into the Unknown” (“Frozen II”)

“Spirit” (“The Lion King”)

“Stand Up” (“Harriet”)

 

Best Original Score

“Motherless Brooklyn”

“Little Women”

“Joker”

“1917”

“Marriage Story”

 

Best Television Series – Drama

“Big Little Lies” 

“The Crown” 

“Killing Eve” 

“The Morning Show”

“Succession” 

 

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy

“Barry”

“Fleabag”

“The Kominsky Method” 

“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” 

“The Politician”

 

Best Actress TV Series – Drama 

Jennifer Aniston, “The Morning Show”

Jodi Comer, “Killing Eve”

Nicole Kidman, “Big Little Lies”

Reese Witherspoon, “The Morning Show”

Olivia Colman, “The Crown”

 

Best Actor TV Series – Drama 

Brian Cox, “Succession”

Kit Harington, “Game of Thrones”

Rami Malek, “Mr. Robot”

Tobias Menzies, “The Crown”

Billy Porter, “Pose”

 

Best Actress TV Series – Comedy

Christina Applegate, “Dead to Me”

Phoebe Waller-Bridge, “Fleabag”

Natasha Lyonne, “Russian Doll”

Kirsten Dunst, “On Becoming a God in Central Florida”

Rachel Brosnahan, “Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”

 

Best Actor TV Series – Comedy 

Ben Platt, “The Politician”

Paul Rudd, “Living With Yourself”

Rami Yousef, “Rami”

Bill Hader, “Barry”

Michael Douglas, “The Kominsky Method”

 

Best Miniseries or Television Film 

“Catch-22”

“Chernobyl”

“Fosse/Verdon”

“The Loudest Voice”

“Unbelievable”

 

Best Actress in a Limited Series or TV Movie

Michelle Williams, “Fosse/Verdon”

Helen Mirren, “Catherine The Great”

Merritt Wever, “Unbelievable” 

Kaitlyn Dever, “Unbelievable”

Joey King, “The Act”

 

Best Actor in a Limited Series or TV Movie

Chris Abbott, “Catch-22”

Sacha Baron Cohen, “The Spy”

Russell Crowe, “The Loudest Voice” 

Jared Harris, “Chernobyl”

Sam Rockwell, “Fosse/Verdon” 

 

Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Limited Series or TV Movie

Meryl Streep, “Big Little Lies”

Helena Bonham Carter, “The Crown”

Emily Watson, “Chernobyl”

Patricia Arquette, “The Act”

Toni Collette, “Unbelievable”

 

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Limited Series or TV Movie

Alan Arkin, “Kominsky Method”

Kieran Culkin, “Succession”

Andrew Scott, “Fleabag”

Stellan Skarsgård, “Chernobyl”

Henry Winkler, “Barry”

With files from Maija Kappler and the Associated Press

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By The Wall of Law December 9, 2019 Off

Lawyer competence includes knowledge of Indigenous-Crown history: B.C. law society

VANCOUVER — The Law Society of British Columbia has moved to require Indigenous cultural competency training for all practising lawyers in the province, in response to gaps in legal education that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission identified.

“Lawyers and the law created a justice system that discriminates against Indigenous people,” said Law Society president Nancy Merrill, noting that it was illegal for a lawyer to take a retainer from an Indigenous person until the 1960s. 

“That’s still recent history,” she said. “We need to move forward.”

Last week, the law society’s board of governors determined that lawyer competence includes knowledge of the history of Indigenous-Crown relations, the history and legacy of residential schools and specific legislation regarding Indigenous peoples in Canada.

Beginning in 2021, all practising lawyers in B.C. will be required to take a six-hour online course covering these areas, as well as legislative changes that could arise from the province’s newly enacted Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act.

Lawyers will have up to two years to complete the course the mandatory course, which is a first among law societies across Canada, Merrill said.

“The law society’s role is to protect the public interest in the administration of justice,” said Vancouver-based lawyer Michael McDonald, who co-chaired the law society’s truth and reconciliation advisory committee. He is also a member of Peguis First Nation in Manitoba. 

“Serving the public interest means a knowledge of the facts of history, even if that history does not show our society in a good light.”

Historically, the legal system was an agent of harm for Indigenous peoples and in some ways it continues to be, McDonald said, pointing to the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in prisons and the judicial system.

Issues of concern to Indigenous peoples permeate all areas of the law, he said, from criminal and family law to corporate law to environmental law to intellectual property and trademark law.

Law students in B.C. are getting some cultural competency training already, but many lawyers have been practising for decades and some are coming to the province from other jurisdictions, said McDonald, adding that the requirements passed by the law society are the “baseline minimum.”

It’s important to support criminal justice lawyers with basic knowledge of key aspects of Indigenous experiences in Canada, such as the ’60s Scoop, during which Canadian government policies facilitated the apprehension of thousands of Indigenous children who were placed with non-Indigenous foster families, McDonald said.

“People who become more aware of that can then use that to inform the quality of their legal services,” he said.

Many real estate lawyers also lack knowledge about the Indian Act and how to strike development deals on reserves, said McDonald.  

“If you’re not aware of the internal politics and the history and culture of the people that give you your instructions, how are you going to be a good lawyer in that deal?”

There is a plan to develop more specific, supplementary courses in the future, he said, which would be voluntary.

In its report released in 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission called upon the Federation of Law Societies of Canada to ensure lawyers receive appropriate cultural competency training, including the history and legacy of residential schools, treaties and Indigenous rights, Indigenous law, and Indigenous-Crown relations, as well as training in conflict resolution and anti-racism.

John Borrows, the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law at the University of Victoria, said he hopes the law society’s cultural competency training might one day delve into Indigenous communities’ own laws and legal traditions.

“It’s opening up those spaces to see Indigenous law, to see the agency of Indigenous clients and the context that they operate from,” he said.

This story by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 9, 2019.

Brenna Owen, The Canadian Press


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By The Wall of Law December 9, 2019 Off

District says it’s not liable for boy, 8, who killed himself

CINCINNATI — The death of an 8-year-old boy whose parents say killed himself after he was bullied by another student is at the centre of a legal fight with his family and the Cincinnati Public Schools.

School officials said the district isn’t liable for the death of Gabriel Taye, pushing for the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals to overturn a federal trial judge’s refusal to dismiss the parents’ wrongful death lawsuit, The Cincinnati Enquirer reported.

The boy’s parents argue that Carson Elementary School never told them that Gabriel was knocked unconscious by another student during an altercation outside a school restroom on Jan. 24, 2017. School officials claim Gabriel told staff he had fainted and never said he had been bullied or assaulted.

The district released a video that shows one boy bullying other students and then, according to the family’s attorneys, pushing Gabriel into a wall when he tried to shake the boy’s hand and knocking him unconscious. The spokeswoman said it’s unclear from the video what happened to Gabriel at that moment.

An assistant principal arrived about 4 1/2 minutes after Gabriel fell to the floor, followed by other school employees and the school nurse, who helped him to his feet, according to surveillance video. He was on the floor for about seven minutes.

The school nurse called Gabriel’s mother, Cornelia Reynolds, and told her that he fainted.

Gabriel returned to school two days later when he was bullied again, according to the lawsuit. He killed himself that night.

Reynolds claims she didn’t learn of the bullying until her attorneys saw a copy of an email written by a Cincinnati police homicide detective in an investigative file that described the scene outside the boys’ bathroom, her lawyers said.

The Associated Press

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By The Wall of Law December 8, 2019 Off

Domestic Abuse Survivors With Brain Injuries Are Falling Through The Cracks

VANCOUVER — A British Columbia mother in her late 30s says there was “no support in sight” after she suffered two serious blows to the head at the hands of different partners more than a decade ago.

“I was exhausted. I had to quit my job because I couldn’t get up,” said the woman, whose name is not being used because she is separated from her child’s father and fears for her family’s safety.

“My head hurt so badly. I wasn’t able to focus. I felt really down on myself because I didn’t know why I couldn’t function properly.”

The mother said it would have been “life changing” if first responders, hospital staff and even family members had been aware of the effects of a potential brain injury from domestic violence and offered her support accordingly.

“I had no understanding that my brain was not working properly,” she said, adding that she did not have trouble focusing, managing her time or multitasking before the first violent incident.

“It’s been hell to figure it out on my own.”

She said learning about the effects of a brain injury helped her overcome the shame she felt after the two blows, which happened several years apart when she was in her 20s.

She sets timers and reminders on her phone to help structure her days and she keeps notes handy with ideas for meals and ingredients that sometimes elude her. She has also become certified in yoga and mindfulness, activities she said help her cope with the chronic effects of multiple concussions.

The B.C. mother is a member of an advisory committee for Supporting Survivors of Abuse and Brain Injury through Research, or SOAR. The organization was founded in 2016 by Karen Mason, the former executive director of the Kelowna Women’s Shelter, and her partner Paul van Donkelaar, a professor in the school of health and exercise sciences at the University of British Columbia’s Okanagan campus.

Compared with brain injury research being done on athletes, the research involving people who have suffered similar injuries from intimate partner violence is in its infancy, said van Donkelaar.

A crisis

The silence and stigma shrouding domestic violence mean those who suffer brain injuries are falling through the cracks of what van Donkelaar calls “an unrecognized public-health crisis in Canada.”

Of nearly 96,000 victims of intimate partner violence reported to police in Canada in 2017, 79 per cent were women, according to Statistics Canada.

But spousal and domestic violence is often not reported to police and it’s hard to determine how many survivors might have experienced traumatic brain injury as a result, said van Donkelaar. 

Based on research from the U.S., including a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, he said the prevalence of brain injuries could be anywhere from 30 to more than 90 per cent of all survivors.

Research underway

The SOAR team is assessing women to determine how many may have sustained traumatic brain injuries and the extent to which their symptoms overlap with sports-related concussions.

The researchers use lab-based tests as well as a questionnaire that includes questions like ‘Did you see stars?’ and ‘Did you lose consciousness or have a period where you couldn’t remember things?’

The first results, published recently in the journal Brain Injury, show all 18 women initially recruited through the Kelowna Women’s Shelter reported symptoms consistent with traumatic brain injury. The research is ongoing and van Donkelaar said his team has now assessed about 60 women.

Domestic violence often includes blows to the head, face or neck, as well as strangulation, said van Donkelaar.

“Each of those experiences absolutely have the potential to cause some form of brain injury, similar to what you would see in many collision sports like football or hockey,” he said.

I remember trying to ask for help and I feel like they treated me like I was intoxicated because I could not speak.B.C. survivor

The B.C. mother said her former partner was strangling her when her head smashed against a bedside table as she tried to fight back.

When family members brought her to the hospital, staff seemed “frustrated” that she didn’t remember exactly what happened and she had difficulty speaking coherently, she said. They stitched up the gash in her head, told her she may have a concussion and advised her to rest at home.

The woman did not return to that abusive relationship, but several years later she sustained another serious blow to the head when a different partner threw her out of a moving car.

She doesn’t remember how she got to the hospital, but she had a similar experience with staff at the hospital, where her then-partner urged her not to disclose what happened.

“I remember trying to ask for help and I feel like they treated me like I was intoxicated because I could not speak.”

They gave her an MRI, said she had a concussion, encouraged her to avoid watching television or otherwise straining her eyes and told her she should be fine within a couple of weeks.

‘Debilitating’ symptoms

In addition to assessments of the cause of the injury and the resulting symptoms, the best predictor of sustaining a concussion is having had one previously, said van Donkelaar.

“Each time, you will be less likely to recover fully,” he said, noting that people who have suffered multiple concussions may end up with chronic symptoms such as dizziness, nausea or difficulty concentrating.

“That can be debilitating and absolutely reduce the quality of life in terms of the ability to hold down a job or go to school or parent your children or interact with colleagues and friends.”

The fear and stigmas that make it difficult for survivors to disclose domestic violence mean that brain injury becomes even more invisible, particularly if there’s a more visible injury, like a broken bone, van Donkelaar said.

In response, SOAR is developing resources to help shelter workers and health-care professionals have conversations with survivors of domestic violence to assess whether they might have a brain injury and refer them to the appropriate support services.

WATCH: A survivor explains why leaving an abusive relationship is so hard. Story continues below.

People with brain injuries often need a range of support services, said Mason, from counselling and parenting help to occupational therapy.

This past summer, the Department of Women and Gender Equality gave $1 million over five years to van Donkelaar and Mason’s work, funding they hope to use to provide training for shelter workers in communities across B.C. next year.

The B.C. mother said she still struggles some days but the knowledge, tools and support she has mean she no longer feels guilty or ashamed.

“I was so upset about why I didn’t feel like myself,” she said.

“Now I’m able to say, ‘Well, there’s a reason I can’t do this,’ and there’s forgiveness.”

This story by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 8, 2019.

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