Federal judicial appointments: Dangerous, undemocratic and unethical

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Allied persuasion: A day after China called Canada “naive” for thinking there’s any value in courting allies to pressure China to release Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, Justin Trudeau shot back at Beijing: “On the contrary what we’re seeing really is that our allies (are) helping us and showing they’re concerned about the behaviour of China towards Canada. Our allies know it is now time to come together to support the values that we share, the rule of law as well.” (Canadian Press)

You be the judge: After it was revealed that five of the last six federally-appointed judges in New Brunswick have ties to Liberal cabinet minister Dominic LeBlanc, Trudeau was grilled by reporters but avoided specifically talking about the five judges in question. Instead, he defended the federal system for appointing judges: “We have a merit-based, transparent appointment system. We are pleased that we have nominated top-notch judges right across the country — and we will continue to.” (Canadian Press)

No, we don’t have a merit-based system, says Democracy Watch’s Duff Conacher, who has filed a complaint with the Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner: “To stop this dangerously undemocratic and unethical appointment process for judges and watchdogs, the appointment process should be suspended until, as in the UK and Ontario, a fully independent public appointment commission is created to conduct public, merit-based searches for nominees and send a short list to Cabinet, with Cabinet required to choose from the list.” (Democracy Watch)

A metro pour vous: Metro users in Montreal have been waiting for an extension to the city’s Blue Line since 1973, but four months before the next federal election works too. Trudeau made the $1.3-billion funding announcement in person. No word yet on whether SNC Lavalin is in the running to build it. (CTV News)

Meme wars: There’s a social media arms race underway in federal politics as groups with pro-oil-industry messages rush to counter the union-backed groups that thrived in the 2015 election, writes Stephen Maher:

Bernard Rudny, a Toronto communications consultant who works with non-profits, tracked Facebook engagements (likes, comments, shares) for 75 days this spring, focusing on the top 52 groups concerned with climate or energy. He discovered that conservative Facebook groups—like Canada Proud and Elect Conservatives—are beating progressive groups by about five to one.

These groups all produce memes and videos on the benefits of petroleum, attack Trudeau and other politicians and environmentalists whom they see as enemies. Most of them did not exist during the last election. (Maclean’s)

Trouble at Rideau Hall: The latest results of the Public Service Employee Survey, a massive probe of the workplace experiences of federal civil servants is out and Nick Taylor-Vaisey digs into the numbers. Whereas Rideau Hall’s managers once outperformed the rest of the public service in the eyes of their employees, things have changed:

The 2018 survey most notably raises questions about what it was like to work at Rideau Hall in the first year of Governor-General Julie Payette’s term. More than two-thirds of Payette’s team, 112 out of 157 Rideau Hall employees, filled out the survey—and 29 of them reported harassment. Forty-two per cent of those who said they were harassed pointed the finger at co-workers, but 71 per cent blamed their superiors (employees could select multiple options). Two-thirds said harassment took the form of an offensive remark, 55 per cent said aggressive behaviour, and 49 per cent cited excessive control. (Maclean’s)

Trading places: Last month Liberal MP Geng Tan surprised everyone by announcing he wouldn’t run for reelection this fall in order to “spend more time with family.”  Now Tan’s wife, Dr. Xinglai Laura Huang, has put her name in the hat to replace him. “I am standing for the Liberal nomination in the riding of Don Valley North as an independent woman,” she said in a statement. Last month the Hill Times reported that one of Tan’s former staffers alleged that she had an affair with the MP and that he is refusing to pay child support for their two-year-old daughter. (Hill Times)

Carneywatch: If there ever was anything to that rumour that some Liberal insiders were organizing a Draft Mark Carney campaign to replace Trudeau if the next election goes awry for the party, they may be out of luck—Carney’s name keeps coming up to be the new head of the International Monetary Fund. “Carney is a smooth internationalist and effective communicator,” Neil Wilson, the chief market analyst at Markets.com, told Yahoo Finance UK. “The IMF is right up his street.” (Yahoo Finance)

Down in the Trump dumps: America’s confidence in itself has fallen to a new low, according to a new survey. But with the “creeping fascism” on display at President Donald Trump’s choreographed Independence Day rally on the National Mall, writes Scott Gilmore, should anyone be surprised? (Maclean’s)

@repost Family Court Lawyers near Me

Via Matrimonial Lawyer

source https://www.macleans.ca/politics/ottawa/federal-judicial-appointments-dangerous-undemocratic-and-unethical/

By The Wall of Law July 5, 2019 Off

Outrage in Russia as abused teen sisters charged with murder

MOSCOW — One evening last summer, Mikhail Khachaturyan decided that his living room wasn’t tidy enough, so he summoned his three teenage daughters one by one and doused each with pepper spray.

There was little unusual about this evening in the Khachaturyan household, according to court records, except for one thing: The sisters decided they couldn’t take the violence and abuse anymore. They waited until their father fell asleep in his rocking chair and attacked him with a kitchen knife and a hammer. He put up a fight, but died within minutes.

The Khachaturyan sisters, now aged 18, 19 and 20, were charged last month with premeditated murder, in a case that has drawn outrage and shone a light on the way the Russian justice system handles domestic violence and sexual abuse cases.

More than 200,000 people have signed an online petition urging the prosecutors to drop the murder charges, which could land the sisters in prison for up to 20 years.

Supporters of the sisters have protested outside Russian embassies in more than 20 locations abroad, and a theatre has staged a performance in solidarity. They had planned a major rally in central Moscow on Saturday, but said they had to cancel it, citing the City Hall refusal to provide security for the gathering.

“The Khachaturyan case is quite indicative of the general situation with domestic violence and how the Russian state responds to this problem,” says Yulia Gorbunova, who authored an extensive report on domestic violence for Human Rights Watch last year.

Pressured by conservative family groups, President Vladimir Putin in 2017 signed a law decriminalizing some forms of domestic violence, which has no fixed definition in the Russian legislation. Police routinely turn a blind eye to cases of domestic abuse, while preventive measures, such as restraining orders, are either lacking or not in wide use.

Court filings showed that the Khachaturyan sisters were repeatedly beaten by their father, a war veteran, and sexually abused. He had kept a stockpile of knifes, guns and rifles at home despite having been diagnosed with a neurological disorder, and was known to shoot indoors. He repeatedly threatened neighbours and family with violence.

The Khacharutyan sisters’ lawyers say the girls were driven to the edge.

“The first day we met,” Krestina’s lawyer Alexei Liptser said, “she said she’s better off here, in jail, than living at home the way she had been.”

Going to the police was not an option for Khachaturyan’s victims, who feared that life for them would only get worse. The girls had shared some of the horrors they had gone through with school friends but pleaded them not to go to the police, In the year before the attack, the girls attended less than two months of classes in total, but the school administration did not interfere.

Prosecutors acknowledge the extraordinary violent circumstances that pushed the teenagers to attack and eventually kill their own father, but they insist that Maria, Angelina and Krestina should be tried for murder. The sisters’ lawyers argue that they were acting in justified self-defence in circumstances of lasting abuse and life-threatening violence.

The sisters have been released on bail and barred from seeing each other, witnesses in the case or the media. They are reportedly in good spirits. “At least, no one is beating them up,” Liptser says.

The case of the three timid teenagers has inspired 29-year-old Zarema Zaudinova to direct a performance at the underground Theater Doc last week, combining the hair-raising experiences of the sisters with performers’ own personal stories. Some members of the audience walked out after one of the more graphic accounts of abuse.

For Zaudinova, the Khachaturyan case was the last straw.

“We have no protection,” she says. “We will either get raped or we will get thrown into prison if we defend ourselves.”

Research on Russian criminal court cases compiled by media outlet Media Zona shows that out of 2,500 women convicted of manslaughter or murder in 2016 to 2018, nearly 2,000 killed a family member in a domestic violence setting.

Human Rights Watch has documented cases where “a very clear case of self-defence” was not recognized as such by prosecutors and led to the victim’s imprisonment, according to Gorbunova.

“The choice is not whether you go to the police and get help,” she says. “The choice for these women was either to die or they had to protect themselves to the best of their ability.”

Almost 2,000 people have recently posted first-person accounts of abuse and victim blaming to social media, after a young woman facing criminal charges for injuring her alleged rapist launched the hashtag #It’snotmyfault.

The bill to replace jail terms with fines in certain cases of domestic violence breezed through the Russian parliament in 2017 and was promptly signed by Putin. But despite its detrimental effect on domestic violence victims, the measure sparked a rare public debate on domestic violence and abuse in a country where a proverb goes: “If he beats you, that means he loves you.”

Gorbunova says that public perception of domestic violence has been changing, triggered by the highly publicized court cases like that of the Khachaturyan sisters or the case of Margarita Gracheva, whose husband, previously reported to the police for threats of violence, took her to a forest and chopped off both of her hands. Gracheva endured online bullying and accusations of “provoking” her spouse before her husband was sentenced to 14 years in prison last year, a rare win for a victim of domestic violence in Russia.

The women of Theater Doc say the verdict in the Khachaturyan sisters’ case would send a strong message to Russian society.

“We need to fight for it, and talk loud and clear about it,” says Zaudinova, who herself told a story onstage of being molested by a male relative at the age of 12. “If the girls get sent to prison and the court doesn’t acknowledge that that was self-defence, they will be putting more people in prison and you won’t be able to do anything to the person who decided to rape you.”

Nataliya Vasilyeva, The Associated Press




@repost Divorce Spousal Maintenance

Via Equitable Distribution

source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/07/05/outrage-in-russia-as-abused-teen-sisters-charged-with-murder/

By The Wall of Law July 5, 2019 Off

Outrage in Russia as abused teen sisters charged with murder

MOSCOW — One evening last summer, Mikhail Khachaturyan decided that his living room wasn’t tidy enough, so he summoned his three teenage daughters one by one and doused each with pepper spray.

There was little unusual about this evening in the Khachaturyan household, according to court records, except for one thing: The sisters decided they couldn’t take the violence and abuse anymore. They waited until their father fell asleep in his rocking chair and attacked him with a kitchen knife and a hammer. He put up a fight, but died within minutes.

The Khachaturyan sisters, now aged 18, 19 and 20, were charged last month with premeditated murder, in a case that has drawn outrage and shone a light on the way the Russian justice system handles domestic violence and sexual abuse cases.

More than 200,000 people have signed an online petition urging the prosecutors to drop the murder charges, which could land the sisters in prison for up to 20 years.

Supporters of the sisters have protested outside Russian embassies in more than 20 locations abroad, and a theatre has staged a performance in solidarity. They had planned a major rally in central Moscow on Saturday, but said they had to cancel it, citing the City Hall refusal to provide security for the gathering.

“The Khachaturyan case is quite indicative of the general situation with domestic violence and how the Russian state responds to this problem,” says Yulia Gorbunova, who authored an extensive report on domestic violence for Human Rights Watch last year.

Pressured by conservative family groups, President Vladimir Putin in 2017 signed a law decriminalizing some forms of domestic violence, which has no fixed definition in the Russian legislation. Police routinely turn a blind eye to cases of domestic abuse, while preventive measures, such as restraining orders, are either lacking or not in wide use.

Court filings showed that the Khachaturyan sisters were repeatedly beaten by their father, a war veteran, and sexually abused. He had kept a stockpile of knifes, guns and rifles at home despite having been diagnosed with a neurological disorder, and was known to shoot indoors. He repeatedly threatened neighbours and family with violence.

The Khacharutyan sisters’ lawyers say the girls were driven to the edge.

“The first day we met,” Krestina’s lawyer Alexei Liptser said, “she said she’s better off here, in jail, than living at home the way she had been.”

Going to the police was not an option for Khachaturyan’s victims, who feared that life for them would only get worse. The girls had shared some of the horrors they had gone through with school friends but pleaded them not to go to the police, In the year before the attack, the girls attended less than two months of classes in total, but the school administration did not interfere.

Prosecutors acknowledge the extraordinary violent circumstances that pushed the teenagers to attack and eventually kill their own father, but they insist that Maria, Angelina and Krestina should be tried for murder. The sisters’ lawyers argue that they were acting in justified self-defence in circumstances of lasting abuse and life-threatening violence.

The sisters have been released on bail and barred from seeing each other, witnesses in the case or the media. They are reportedly in good spirits. “At least, no one is beating them up,” Liptser says.

The case of the three timid teenagers has inspired 29-year-old Zarema Zaudinova to direct a performance at the underground Theater Doc last week, combining the hair-raising experiences of the sisters with performers’ own personal stories. Some members of the audience walked out after one of the more graphic accounts of abuse.

For Zaudinova, the Khachaturyan case was the last straw.

“We have no protection,” she says. “We will either get raped or we will get thrown into prison if we defend ourselves.”

Research on Russian criminal court cases compiled by media outlet Media Zona shows that out of 2,500 women convicted of manslaughter or murder in 2016 to 2018, nearly 2,000 killed a family member in a domestic violence setting.

Human Rights Watch has documented cases where “a very clear case of self-defence” was not recognized as such by prosecutors and led to the victim’s imprisonment, according to Gorbunova.

“The choice is not whether you go to the police and get help,” she says. “The choice for these women was either to die or they had to protect themselves to the best of their ability.”

Almost 2,000 people have recently posted first-person accounts of abuse and victim blaming to social media, after a young woman facing criminal charges for injuring her alleged rapist launched the hashtag #It’snotmyfault.

The bill to replace jail terms with fines in certain cases of domestic violence breezed through the Russian parliament in 2017 and was promptly signed by Putin. But despite its detrimental effect on domestic violence victims, the measure sparked a rare public debate on domestic violence and abuse in a country where a proverb goes: “If he beats you, that means he loves you.”

Gorbunova says that public perception of domestic violence has been changing, triggered by the highly publicized court cases like that of the Khachaturyan sisters or the case of Margarita Gracheva, whose husband, previously reported to the police for threats of violence, took her to a forest and chopped off both of her hands. Gracheva endured online bullying and accusations of “provoking” her spouse before her husband was sentenced to 14 years in prison last year, a rare win for a victim of domestic violence in Russia.

The women of Theater Doc say the verdict in the Khachaturyan sisters’ case would send a strong message to Russian society.

“We need to fight for it, and talk loud and clear about it,” says Zaudinova, who herself told a story onstage of being molested by a male relative at the age of 12. “If the girls get sent to prison and the court doesn’t acknowledge that that was self-defence, they will be putting more people in prison and you won’t be able to do anything to the person who decided to rape you.”

Nataliya Vasilyeva, The Associated Press




@repost Joint Custody Child Support

Via Good Family Lawyers

source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/07/05/outrage-in-russia-as-abused-teen-sisters-charged-with-murder/

By The Wall of Law July 5, 2019 Off

What To Watch On Netflix Canada In July 2019

Be very honest with yourself: would you rather head out into the heat and humidity, or curl up in an air-conditioned home where it’s cozy and comfortable and catch up on your stories?

Luckily for all of us homebodies, streaming services are making sure we can stay in as much as we want.  We have new season of “Stranger Things,” “Queer Eye,” and “Orange is the New Black,” comedy specials from Whitney Cummings and Canadian comedian Katherine Ryan, and crowd-pleasing movies like “Jumanji,” “Jackie Brown” and “The Fate of the Furious.

Here’s what’s coming to — and leaving from — Netflix Canada in July 2019.

July 1

Cafarnaúm

After running away from his negligent parents, committing a violent crime and being sentenced to five years in jail, a hardened, streetwise 12-year-old Lebanese boy sues his parents in protest of the life they have given him.

Designated Survivor: 60 Days

The Korean show is about a scientist-turned-politician who must act as president when an explosion at the National Assembly kills everyone ahead of him in the presidential succession.

The Fate Of The Furious

The eighth (!) installment of the franchise features Charlize Theron alongside Vin Diesel, Jason Statham, Michelle Rodriguez, The Rock and Kurt Russell.

From Dusk Till Dawn

George Clooney and Quentin Tarantino play two criminals who unknowingly seek temporary refuge in a truck stop populated by vampires, with chaotic results.

Ghostbusters

In the original version of the oft-remade and sequelled movie, three former parapsychology professors set up shop as a unique ghost removal service.

Ghostbusters: original flavour is coming to Netflix.

Girlfight

Without telling her father, a young woman trains as a boxer and achieves impressive success.

Jackie Brown

A middle-aged woman finds herself in the middle of a huge conflict that will either make her a profit or cost her life.

Jumanji

Another excellent original, starring Robin Williams and a young Kirsten Dunst as people who get caught up in a very dangerous board game.

Katherine Ryan: Glitter Room

In her new comedy special, Canadian-born, U.K.-dwelling comedian Katherine Ryan talks Kardashians, following a man to Japan, and meeting her daughter’s first celebrity crush.

Comedian Katherine Ryan lives in the UK with her

Kill Bill: Vol. II

In the second part of Tarantino’s epic film, a former assassin known only as The Bride continues her quest of vengeance against her former boss and lover Bill, the reclusive bouncer Budd, and the treacherous, one-eyed Elle.

Life As We Know It

Two single adults (Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel) become caregivers to an orphaned girl when their mutual best friends die in an accident in this very 2010 rom-com.

Midnight Express

An American college student, is caught smuggling drugs out of Turkey and thrown into prison in the 1978 movie that scared all teens traveling internationally.

Mike Tyson Mysteries, Season 4

Yes, there is a fourth season of the animated show where Mike Tyson and his daughter solve mysteries with “a wimpy gay gentleman ghost and a cursed perverse mean-spirited talking pigeon.”

Spiderman: Homecoming

This is the 2017 “Spiderman” with Tom Holland and Zendaya — not to be confused with the Tobey Maguire or the Andrew Garfield versions.

Swiped

When two college roommates (one of whom is Noah Centineo) develop a groundbreaking hookup app, casual affairs — and complications — soon run rampant on campus.

War Against Women

Filmed over three years in 10 countries, this documentary gives voice to the women who have become victims of sexual violence as weapons of war.

War For The Planet Of The Apes

After the apes suffer unimaginable losses, Caesar wrestles with his darker instincts and begins his own mythic quest to avenge his kind.

The World’s Most Extraordinary Homes, Season 2

Award-winning architect Piers Taylor and actress/property enthusiast Caroline Quentin travel the world touring beautifully unconventional homes.

July 2

Bangkok Love Stories: Objects of Affection

A kind computer repairman falls for a street-smart graffiti artist whose multiple personality disorder worsens after she witnesses a double murder. 

Bangkok Love Stories: Plead

In Bangkok’s Chinatown, a spirited digital marketing expert falls for a blind fortune-teller, but their love is predestined to end in disaster.

July 3

The Blues Brothers

In this classic comedy, Dan Aykroyd and Jim Belushi play two-bit crooks who go on a mission to save the Catholic home where they were raised.

Dazed And Confused

Makes sense that this classic end-of-school comedy is back for the summer — it’s a perfect summer movie, with a star-studded cast and an iconic Matthew McConaughey performance.

The Kingdom

A team of U.S. government agents are sent to investigate the bombing of an American facility in the Middle East.

The Last Czars

When social upheaval sweeps Russia in the early 20th century, Czar Nicholas II resists change, sparking a revolution and ending in dynasty.

The Mummy 

Hope you’re in the mood for a marathon of “The Mummy,” because spoiler alert, here they all are! In the first movie, an American serving in the French Foreign Legion accidentally awakens a mummy who begins to wreck havoc as he searches for the reincarnation of his long-lost love.

The Mummy Returns

The mummified body of Imhotep is shipped to a museum in London, where he once again wakes and begins his campaign of rage and terror.

The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor

The third movie travels to China, where an emperor (Jet Li) — you guessed it — was cursed by a witch to becoming a shape-shifting mummy.

The Scorpion King

In the spinoff of “The Mummy,” The Rock plays a desert warrior who rises up against the evil army destroying his homeland. 

Sea of Love

A detective investigating a series of murders becomes involved with a woman who may be the culprit.

Vox Lux

An unusual set of circumstances brings unexpected success to a pop star (Natalie Portman).

July 4

Kakegurui, Season 2

In this anime series, a gambling prodigy comes to an elite school run by games and turns the order upside down.

Stranger Things, Season 3

In the third season of the hit show, it’s summertime, there’s a new mall in town, and danger is looming.

July 6

Free Reign, Season 3

In this family show, competition heats up at Bright Fields over the summer as tryouts for the “UK Under 18s” team pit friend against friend for just one available spot.

Sicilian Ghost Story

After the boy she loves vanishes, a teenage girl ventures into the forest to search for him.

July 8

The Emoji Movie

Admit it: you’re curious. 

July 9

Disney’s Mary Poppins Returns

Decades after her original visit, the magical nanny (Emily Blunt) returns to help the Banks siblings and Michael’s children through a difficult time in their lives.

July 10

Captain Underpants: The Epic First Movie

Two overly imaginative pranksters hypnotize their principal into thinking he’s a ridiculously enthusiastic, incredibly dimwitted superhero named Captain Underpants.

Family Reunion

When the McKellan family moves from Seattle to Georgia, life down South — and traditional grandparents — challenge their new-age ways.

Parchís: El documental

This documentary provides an in-depth look at 1980s Spanish kids band Parchís, through interviews with ex-members and other insiders, concert footage and more.

Spanish kids' band Parchís is the subject of a new documentary.

July 11

Cities of Last Things

In a dystopian tale unfolding in reverse chronology, a man with a complicated past takes revenge on the individuals who wronged him decades ago.

July 12

3Below: Tales of Arcadia, Part 2

Still stranded in Arcadia, royal alien siblings Aja and Krel continue their quest to return home as General Morando plots a course to invade Earth.

4 latas

In hopes of visiting a dying friend, longtime pals reunite for a desert road trip from Spain to Mali.

Blown Away

A competitive reality series about glass blowing, where artists must impress a panel of judges in the hopes of winning a huge cash prize.

Bonus Family, Season 3

As Martin adjusts to life with a new partner and baby, Lisa and Patrik grapple with difficult news, and Katja reconnects with an old flame.

Extreme Engagement

An engaged twosome take their love on the road and test their commitment as they explore eight cultures’ marriage traditions in the span of one year.

Kidnapping Stella

Snatched off the street and held for ransom, a bound and gagged woman uses her limited powers to derail her two masked abductors’ carefully laid plans.

Luis Miguel, The Series, Season 1

The show dramatizes the life story of Mexican superstar singer Luis Miguel, who has captivated audiences in Latin America and beyond for decades.

Point Blank

An ER nurse and a career criminal are forced into an unlikely partnership in taking down a ring of corrupt cops threatening the lives of both of their families.

Frank Grillo and Anthony Mackie in

Taco Chronicles

A tribute to the mighty taco: its history, significance in Mexico, global appeal and varieties: pastor, carnitas, canasta, asada, barbacoa and guisados.

July 15

American History X

A former neo-nazi skinhead tries to prevent his younger brother from going down the same wrong path that he did.

Hall Pass

Two men who are both having trouble in their marriages are given a “hall pass” by their wives, and for one week, they can do whatever they want.

RuPaul’s Drag Race, Season 1

The first season of the wildly popular drag-based competition series finally joins the others.

July 16

Frankenstein’s Monster’s Monster, Frankenstein

In this mockumentary, “Stranger Things” actor David Harbour uncovers lost footage from his father’s televised stage play, Frankenstein’s Monster’s Monster, Frankenstein.

David Harbour in the mockumentary

July 17

Pinky Malinky, Part 3

Pinky Malinky isn’t the type of hot dog boy who sits around on his buns. With his BFFs Babs and JJ, he’s learning how to relish the little things.

July 18

Secret Obsession

Recuperating from trauma, Jennifer (Brenda Song) remains in danger as she returns to a life she doesn’t remember.

Suits, Season 8

No, Meghan Markle isn’t in this series, but Katherine Heigl plays a new lawyer.

July 19

Comedians In Cars Getting Coffee

Seth Rogen and Jerry Seinfeld in the new season of

Jerry Seinfeld’s roving talk show combines coffee, laughs and vintage cars into quirky, caffeine-fueled adventures with the sharpest minds in comedy.

The Epic Tales of Captain Underpants, Season 3

If you didn’t get enough Captain Underpants from the movie released a few days earlier, it’s also a show!

La Casa del Papel, Part 3

Eight thieves take hostages and lock themselves in the Royal Mint of Spain as a criminal mastermind manipulates the police to carry out his plan.

Last Chance U: INDY: Part 2 

Last Chance U returns to give viewers an intense, unfiltered look at the junior college football program at Independence Community College. 

Queer Eye, Season 4

The Fab Five are back in Kansas City, Mo! Join Antoni, Bobby, Jonathan, Karamo and Tan for a new group of inspirational heroes, jaw-dropping makeovers and tons of happy tears.

The Fab 5 are back.

Saint Seiya: Knights of the Zodiac

Sworn to protect the reincarnation of the goddess Athena, Seiya and the Knights of the Zodiac aid her in battle against those who seek to end mankind in this anime series.

Typewriter

A haunted house and a haunted book stir the imagination of a group of young, wannabe ghost hunters, and a dog, determined to capture the ghost that plagues the notorious home in their neighbourhood in Goa.

July 24

The Great Hack

Explore how a data company named Cambridge Analytica came to symbolize the dark side of social media in the wake of the 2016 presidential election.

July 25

Another Life

Astronaut Niko Breckinridge (Katee Sackhoff), who’s searching for alien intelligence, leads a crew on a mission to explore the genesis of an alien artifact. 

July 26

Anna And The Apocalypse

When a zombie apocalypse threatens a sleepy town at Christmas, Anna and her friends to fight, slash and sing their way to survival.

Boi

As a young Catalan chauffeur drives two Chinese businessmen around Barcelona, he finds himself falling deeper into an illusory adventure.

Girl With Balls

Stranded in the woods and eyeballed by twisted hunters, members of a women’s volleyball team bump it up in the most dangerous game of their lives.

My First Love, Season 2

Tae-o and his friends navigate the twists and turns of friendship and love, as they face new challenges in their relationships with one another.

Nobody’s Fool

In this Tyler Perry rom-com, a woman is released from prison and reunites with her sister. She soon discovers that her sister is in an online relationship with a man who may not be what he seems.

Orange Is The New Black, Season 7

The seventh season of

The new season will be the last for this show about a privileged New Yorker who ends up in a woman’s prison.

The Son

During pregnancy, a woman becomes obsessed with taking care of the baby, isolating it from the world and its father.

Sugar Rush, Season Two

Time’s the most important ingredient as teams race against the clock — and each other — to bake up the best-tasting sweets.

The Worst Witch, Season 3

Armed with newfound confidence, Mildred returns to Cackle’s Academy, where her mother is joining the staff as the school’s first non-witch teacher.

July 30

Hot Summer Nights

An awkward teenager (Timothée Chalamet) gets in over his head dealing drugs while falling for his business partner’s enigmatic sister during one scorching summer in Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Whitney Cummings: Can I Touch It?

Filmed at the Sidney Harmon Hall in the comedian’s hometown of Washington, DC, her special asks how men are holding up with all the “new” rules they have to follow now, and muses on whether we should give sex robots a chance. 

July 31

Kengan Ashura, Part 1

Underground gladiator Tokita Ohma fights on behalf of business mogul Nogi Hideki who wagers mega-business deals on the outcome of these brutal matches.

The Letdown, Season 2

Audrey, mother of a 2-month-old, joins a new-parents support group, where she makes some quirky friends facing various challenges and life changes.

The Red Sea Diving Resort

Inspired by true life rescue missions, the movie tells the story of a group of international agents and brave Ethiopians who in the early 1980s used a deserted holiday retreat in Sudan as a front to smuggle thousands of refugees to Israel.

Michael K. Williams and Chris Evans in

And here’s what’s leaving Netflix this July:

July 2

Bring It On

Disney’s Pirates Of The Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales

The Bourne Identity

The Bourne Legacy

The Bourne Supremacy

The Bourne Ultimatum

July 14

The Holiday

July 15

Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown, seasons 1-8

July 24

Marvel Studios’ Guardians Of The Galaxy

@repost Attorneys for Child Support Cases

Via Equalization Formula

source https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/netflix-canada-july-2019_ca_5d18d2c2e4b07f6ca57f02aa

By The Wall of Law July 5, 2019 Off

Dubai’s ruler, estranged wife headed for court clash in UK

LONDON — A legal battle between the powerful, poetry-writing ruler of Dubai and his wealthy estranged wife is leading toward a showdown in a London courtroom later this month.

The family division court case scheduled on July 30 pits Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum against Princess Haya, daughter of the late King Hussein of Jordan and an accomplished Olympic equestrian on friendly terms with horse aficionado Queen Elizabeth II.

The hearing is expected to focus on who will have custody of their two young children now that the princess has left Dubai. She is believed to be in Britain, where she owns a gated mansion on Buckingham Palace Gardens, a private street lined with some of the world’s most expensive homes and cars.

Gregory Katz, The Associated Press


@repost Family Divorce

Via Equalisation Payment

source https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/07/04/dubais-ruler-estranged-wife-headed-for-court-clash-in-uk/

By The Wall of Law July 4, 2019 Off